ultraviolet

(redirected from UVB radiation)
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Related to UVB radiation: Ultraviolet B, UV radiation

ultraviolet

the part of the electromagnetic spectrum with wavelengths shorter than light but longer than X-rays; in the range 0.4 × 10--6 and 1 × 10--8 metres

ultraviolet

[¦əl·trə′vī·lət]
(physics)
Pertaining to ultraviolet radiation. Abbreviated UV.

UltraViolet

(1) See ultraviolet light.

(2) A cloud-based storage locker for licensed content from the Digital Entertainment Content Ecosystem (see DECE). Under the Digital HD brand, purchases of Blu-ray discs with redeemable coupons and purchases of movies and TV shows (not rental) from participating online retailers entitles users to keep their content in the UltraViolet cloud and stream or download it as required.

Depending on the retailer's agreement, content might be sharable with friends and family, and parental access can be applied. A physical disc may also be obtainable. See Digital HD, Blu-ray Combo Pack and media locker.
References in periodicals archive ?
62) Compellingly, researchers found that silibinin helps repair DNA damage caused by previous exposure to UVB radiation.
In this study, UVB radiation accelerated collagen degradation in NHDFs and hairless mice via activated collagenolytic MMP-1.
The first report associating Rho GTPase activity with UV radiation-induced DNA damage in human cells and DNA repair signaling pathways showed that RhoB is an early-response gene induced by DNA damage agents which participates in the initial signaling events in response to genotoxic stress promoted by UVB radiation [18].
Most have been designed to protect against UVB radiation, and their level of protection is represented by the sun protection factor (SPF) (14, 15).
20) Photoadaptive cutaneous hyperplasia, which impedes the penetration of UVB radiation, occurs with repeated exposure.
Westerhof W, Nieuweboer--Krobotova L: Treatment of vitiligo with UVB radiation vs topical psoralen plus UV-A.
The stratospheric ozone layer effectively absorbs most UVB radiation and all UVC radiation, but some UVB and most UVA wavelengths still reach the Earth's surface.
The vast majority of sunburns are caused by ultraviolet B or UVB radiation.
Sunglasses should block 99 to 100 percent of both UVA and UVB radiation and screen out 75 to 90 percent of visible light.
Sunburn, a leading risk factor to melanoma, is caused by exposure to the sun's UVA and UVB radiation.
When available, UVB radiation from sunlight penetrates the skin, coming into contact with a substance called 7-dehydrocholesterol, which is converted to vitamin D3.
Products that have proved through testing that they protect against UVA and UVB radiation can claim that they are "broad spectrum" and will be labeled as SPF 15 or higher.