Ugolino

Ugolino

when his children die of starvation in prison, he devours them. [Ital. Poetry: Inferno]

Ugolino

treacherous 13th-century count of Pisa, imprisoned and starved to death with his sons and grandsons. [Ital. Poetry: Inferno]

Ugolino

13th-century count of Pisa who treacherously deserted his own party and then twice joined the enemies of his own city. [Ital. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 921]
References in classic literature ?
He clung to one idea -- that of his happiness, destroyed, without apparent cause, by an unheard-of fatality; he considered and reconsidered this idea, devoured it (so to speak), as the implacable Ugolino devours the skull of Archbishop Roger in the Inferno of Dante.
Directed by Joan Olle, it starred Vargas Llosa himself as the Duque Ugolino and Aitana Sanchez-Gijon as Aminta, or the Condesa de la Santa Croce.
His vision was sacrosanct and he fought with all his strength to achieve it, turning in a miraculous way a huge block of marble into a human being with every detail of the human body exquisitely observed - from the perfectly-shaped toes and eyes to hands where the fingers of a passionate man actually are impressed into the flesh they are grasping (as in the sculpture Ugolino and His Sons, pictured, a miracle in marble and part of the exhibition).
In Dante's Hell, Ugolino is bound by ice together with Archbishop Ruggieri, the man who had betrayed and then imprisoned him, causing his death.
Through her discussion of fraud in the final chapter of the work Tarabotti allusively engages with the ethical dimensions of poetic mimesis that arise in Dante's text, exploring the risks faced in representing and denouncing evil through a series of allusions to Inferno sixteen and seventeen and Dante's encounter with the arch-traitor Count Ugolino in Inferno thirty-two to thirty-three.
The occasion was the showing of Fuseli's Ugolino at the Royal Academy's annual exhibition.
Singleton writes that as podesta (potentate) of Pisa, Ugolino "entered into the negotiations referred to by his opponents as the 'tradimento de le castella' ('betrayal of the castles').
Dante's Hell at Pertosa Caves Every Friday and Saturday in the grotte (caves) of Pertosa in the province of Salerno, "Dante" guides a tour through his inferno, introducing guests to Paolo and Francesca of Rimini, Ulysses, Minos, Count Ugolino, and other characters you'll find in the first book of The Divine Comedy.
A call for breaking the shell of egocentricism and establishing unity with the Other is heard towards the end of The Waste Land as Eliot evokes claustrophobic images of enclosed and ruined towers to be interpreted both as symbols of the impenetrable circle of our personal experiences, an image reinforced by the poet's involvement with Bradley's solipsism and Nerval's Desdichado, as well as Dante's depiction of the thirteenth-century politician Ugolino in the lowest circle of the Inferno.
Francis at Assisi (late thirteenth century); Angelo Clareno's History of the Seven Tribulations of the Order of Brothers Minor (1326); and Ugolino da Montegiorgio's Deeds of Blessed Francis and his Companions (1327-1337)--we learn not only about the organization of the order and its place within the late medieval Church but also about the evolving nature of medieval spirituality.
360) echoes both Tennyson's "Ulysses" and Dante's Inferno, 26 (as well as Dante's tale-telling Ugolino, in Inferno, 33).