Ugolino

Ugolino

when his children die of starvation in prison, he devours them. [Ital. Poetry: Inferno]

Ugolino

treacherous 13th-century count of Pisa, imprisoned and starved to death with his sons and grandsons. [Ital. Poetry: Inferno]

Ugolino

13th-century count of Pisa who treacherously deserted his own party and then twice joined the enemies of his own city. [Ital. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 921]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
I supped on the horrors of Ugolino's fate with the strong gust of youth, which finds every, exercise of sympathy a pleasure.
Among our body count we the versatile and talented Ugolino; the justly celebrated Rodolpho; the gifted and accomplished Roderigo; the management have spared neither pains nor expense--"
He clung to one idea -- that of his happiness, destroyed, without apparent cause, by an unheard-of fatality; he considered and reconsidered this idea, devoured it (so to speak), as the implacable Ugolino devours the skull of Archbishop Roger in the Inferno of Dante.
In the original, when Ugolino addresses his listener directly his speech is plain and forthright, as in lines 10--12:
(7) Cosi Georges Mounin aveva concluso il suo volume su Les Problemes theoriques de la traduction contrastando i paradossi deH'"intraducibilita" babelica con la Torre della Fame del conte Ugolino, e ripensando il poema dantesco anche alla luce dei campi di sterminio (1963: 277-278; cfr.
Lo stesso vale per il fiero pasto del conte Ugolino; anche qui il celeberrimo verso e ripreso puntualmente dal Marino (Adone, XIV 166) (14), ma era certo ben presente a Serafino Aquilano, all'Ariosto (Orlando furioso) e poi al Monti (Bassvilliana), che usano tutti fiero pasto in clausola.
Este final abierto reproduce la reticencia expresada por Ugolino en el penultimo canto del Infierno dantesco: "dice que el hambre pudo mas que el dolor".
Ugolino Ramero de la Gherardesca--last of a line who appear in Dante--is presented not as a Babylonian god, but as a young Don Quixote.
Claudia Villa rilegge l'episodio di Ugolino alla luce del Tieste di Seneca constatando "come l'invenzione della pena di Ugolino rappresenti un evidente aumento della pena di Tantalo" (123).
(9.) Ugolino Martelli's Il furto was performed in the Sala del Papa on 9 November 1544.
Thumbnail sketches and apt quotations, culled from enviably learned researches, bring alive for us such key figures as Dante's tutor, Brunett Latini, doomed lovers Paolo and Francesca and hate-figure Count Ugolino who ate his own children.