Uitlanders


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Uitlanders

 

European—mainly British—emigrants who settled in the Boer republics of the Transvaal (South African Republic) and the Orange Free State from 1870 to 1900, after the discovery of gold and diamonds in those states. The settlers provided a foothold for British expansion in southern Africa, which led to the Boer War (1899–1902). As a pretext for launching the war, Great Britain cited the Boers’ refusal to grant voting rights to the settlers.

References in periodicals archive ?
Kruger het sekere toegewings gemaak ten opsigte van die verblyftydperk wat moet verloop voordat 'n "uitlander" stemreg kan verkry (onder andere 'n vermindering van vyf jaar op die aanvanklike tydperk).
Leander Starr Jameson, with the tacit support of the British government, led a raid into the Transvaal, in hopes of encouraging an uprising of the Uitlanders. His force was quickly defeated by the Commandos and Jameson was captured.
The negotiations were ostensibly about the franchise of the Uitlander community, a diverse but largely British population of workers in the SAR, but the war quickly came to represent the fight between Afrikaner political independence and jingoistic British imperial control.
The sensational pressures of German-British competition over the exogamous source of remonetarization that is played out through surrogates (Uitlanders and Boers) acts as a key narrative context for Dracula, written within the press froth over Jameson's raid and the Kruger telegram.
For example, in his chapter on the origins of the New Zealand commitment, Ian McGibbon argues that at the heart of New Zealand's involvement was a mixture of imperial and national sentiment, and a concern for the civil rights of the Uitlanders in the Boer republics.
He rejected the second consideration, the claims of injustice towards the British and other foreigners in the Transvaal, the 'Uitlanders'.
When in Johannesburg I began to understand the uitlanders, those mostly British and Greater British immigrants (including many Australians) who built the city on gold in the 1880s and 1890s and whose agitation against the Transvaal government was a cause of the war.
Kruger was unsympathetic to the economic aspirations of the "uitlanders"(7) and concerned by increased troops in the British-controlled Colonies of the Cape and Natal, as well as in the former Rhodesian Colony.
When the rich Witwatersrand gold fields were discovered in 1886, thousands of so-called "uitlanders" (foreigners), mostly British immigrants, flocked to the Transvaal in search of wealth.
The justification for the Boer War was the position of the Uitlanders in the Transvaal.
Its more endemic function was to act as a vantage point from which Kruger's forces could survey the foreign miners (uitlanders) in the mining camp that was Johannesburg below, and who, Kruger believed, were plotting to overthrow him (Gevisser 509).