Uitlanders


Also found in: Dictionary.

Uitlanders

 

European—mainly British—emigrants who settled in the Boer republics of the Transvaal (South African Republic) and the Orange Free State from 1870 to 1900, after the discovery of gold and diamonds in those states. The settlers provided a foothold for British expansion in southern Africa, which led to the Boer War (1899–1902). As a pretext for launching the war, Great Britain cited the Boers’ refusal to grant voting rights to the settlers.

References in periodicals archive ?
Afrikaners generally united as a political community, unlike the Uitlanders.
In covert conjunction with the British government, Leander Starr Jameson, the administrator general for Matabeleland, brought an armed force across the Transvaal border in the last days of 1895 with the aim of inciting an Uitlander uprising that would topple the Boer regime and secure the region for British interests.
Soos die titel aandui, is die drama 'n dramatiese voorstelling van 'n vergadering tussen 'n gemeenskapsraad, die inwoners en die uitlanders of afspringers van 'n dorp.
The fact that ninety per cent of the wealth and the land in the Transvaal belonged to Uitlanders showed 'the absolute hollowness of all these charges of extortion, cruelty and injustice'.
In the end the uitlanders proved unable to do either.
Tensions arose between the Boers and uitlanders when the latter demanded equal rights, including the vote.
Die verskillende beleweniswerelde van die horendes en die dowes, die kunstenaars en die massas, die uitlanders en die SuidAfrikaners kontekstualiseer ook die ervaring by die leser van die saambestaan van twee werelde.
The Boers resented the influx of Uitlanders (outsiders) and compelled them to pay higher taxes and refused to give them the vote.
The Uitlanders (non-Boers) of Kruger's republic who had constantly clamoured for political rights, were equated with urban Africans in the `white' cities, officially described as `temporary sojourners' in the urban areas, who now also demanded political rights.
In the mid-1880s, the discovery of vast gold deposits in the Transvaal led to large numbers of Uitlanders settling in the region and resulting tension between these (mainly British) foreigners and the Boers.
Twee ander soos biegajcie, biegajcie ("gee pad", "vlug") uit 1241 en daj, ac ja pobrusze, a ty poczywaj ("gee vir my, ek gaan die maalstene maal en jy rus") uit 1270 kom van uitlanders, respektiewelik 'n Tartaar en 'n Tsjeg.
The Boers were concerned that they would be overwhelmed by the influx of people, and they denied voting rights to the uitlanders or `outsiders' in an attempt to ensure that their strictly agricultural, religious way of life was preserved.