Ukiyo-E


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Ukiyo-E

 

a Japanese school of art that originated in the 17th century and reflected democratic tendencies related to the rapid development of urban life. The paintings and woodcuts of the ukiyo-e masters were widely circulated in the form of prints. In contrast to works of the aristocratic schools of Kano and Tosa, they depicted the everyday life of artisans, merchants, actors, and geishas. Ukiyo-e, which became highly developed in the 18th century, heralded the flourishing of the Japanese woodcut. The chief representatives of the school were Matabei and Moronobu. In the 18th and 19th centuries, Sharaku, Toyokuni, Utamaro, Hi-roshige, and Hokusai were also associated with ukiyo-e.

REFERENCE

laponskaia graviura. Moscow, 1963.
References in periodicals archive ?
After that I consumed Japanese Ukiyo-e (wood block prints) and tried imitating and mixing it with my own art.' As he immersed further to contemporary wood block art-Jed Henry's and David Bull's interpretation of fictional characters in Ukiyo-e prints, for example-that prompted him to come up with his own unique prints.
Japanese art historian, dealer, and collector Richard Lane considers Kiyochika to be both the last important ukiyo-e artist and the first exponent of the modern Japanese woodcut.
As it was mentioned earlier, he started his career as an ukiyo-e artist.
Referring to many of the prints in that series, most notably The Letter, the Guggeheim Museum website states, "She adapted the ukiyo-e (the floating world) theme of women's everyday lives to scenes showing a modern French woman, as she went about caring for a child, trying on a dress, and, in this work, sealing an envelope."
It presented an ancient Japan such as the audience would have recognised from paintings and woodblock prints (ukiyo-e, meaning "the image of") by artists such as Kitagawa Utamaro (1754-1806).
The Japanese term for the woodblock art, ukiyo-e, means "pictures of the floating world," embodying the Buddhist concept of impermanence.
Islamabad -- Exhibition "Evolving Imagery: Ukiyo-e and Contemporary Prints from Japan" was inaugurated Wednesday here at the premises of the National Art Gallery, Islamabad it will remain open till 25th June.
Often working himself sick, stressing over his attempts to create designs he feels can compete with those of his idols, whether they be tattooers or Ukiyo-e masters.
Shunga was mainly produced within the school of ukiyo-e, or pictures of the floating world.
Ukiyo-e, literally "pictures of the floating world" in Japanese, is the word for these woodblock prints and paintings which feature motifs of landscapes, tales from history, theatre, and daily life.