Ukiyo-E


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Ukiyo-E

 

a Japanese school of art that originated in the 17th century and reflected democratic tendencies related to the rapid development of urban life. The paintings and woodcuts of the ukiyo-e masters were widely circulated in the form of prints. In contrast to works of the aristocratic schools of Kano and Tosa, they depicted the everyday life of artisans, merchants, actors, and geishas. Ukiyo-e, which became highly developed in the 18th century, heralded the flourishing of the Japanese woodcut. The chief representatives of the school were Matabei and Moronobu. In the 18th and 19th centuries, Sharaku, Toyokuni, Utamaro, Hi-roshige, and Hokusai were also associated with ukiyo-e.

REFERENCE

laponskaia graviura. Moscow, 1963.
References in periodicals archive ?
As it was mentioned earlier, he started his career as an ukiyo-e artist.
Ukiyo-e is the Japanese woodblock prints of the Edo era (1603-1867) in Japan.
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No matter how earthy the subject is, however, each ukiyo-e piece is done with utmost refinement.
The remaining chapters describe different schools and types of art, including portraiture, the idealizing function of ukiyo-e, and Buddhist art, concluding with the impact of the arrival of Europeans.
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Saleem Peeradina's poetic response to Hiroshige (WLT, November 2009, 29-30) took me back to a delightful discovery of my childhood--another ukiyo-e artist, Hokusai.
Degas, Van Gogh and Toulouse Lautrec all admired the two dimensional imagery of ukiyo-e, its composition and flat areas of bold colours.
If your first impulse is to flash Vania a hefty side-eye, you're not wrong--but a closer read reveals his admiration for ukiyo-e (traditional Japanese woodblocking) and also that while the women are bound, in other ways so are the men, creating a complex, psychosexual fantasia.
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The world's unsurpassed collection of Japanese ukiyo-e paintings inaugurates the new Garfield Weston Exhibition Hall