Odysseus

(redirected from Ulixes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Ulixes: Odysseus

Odysseus

(ōdĭs`ēəs), Lat. Ulysses (yo͞olĭs`ēz), in Greek mythology, son and successor of King Laertes of Ithaca. A leader of Greek forces during the Trojan War, Odysseus was noted (as in the Iliad) for his cunning strategy and his wise counsel. He is the central figure of the Odyssey, which tells of his adventures after the fall of Troy. In post-Homeric legend, however, he was pictured as a wily, lying, and evil man. He avoided service in the Trojan War by feigning madness—until exposed by Palamedes, whom he later treacherously caused to be executed.

Bibliography

See E. Hamilton, Mythology (1942, repr. 1971).

Odysseus

(oh-diss -ee-ŭs. -diss -yooss) See Tethys.

Odysseus

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Odysseus, asteroid 1,143 (the 1,143d asteroid to be discovered, on January 28, 1930), is approximately 174 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 12 years. Odysseus was named after the hero of Homer’s Odyssey. J. Lee Lehman associates this asteroid with the ability to view a situation from a fresh perspective, without projecting past experiences onto each new moment. Jacob Schwartz gives Odysseus’s astrological significance as “cleverness in solving problems.”

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford Press, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Odysseus

 

(Ulysses), in ancient Greek mythology, the king of Ithaca who won renown in the Trojan War; the hero of the poem The Odyssey, which tells the story of Odysseus’ long years of wandering and his return to his homeland.

Odysseus was known not only for his bravery but also for his clever and resourceful mind (hence his sobriquet “the crafty-minded”). Odysseus’ adventures and his return to his faithful wife, Penelope, were the subject of a number of literary works by such authors as Homer, Sophocles, and Euripides. Episodes from Odysseus’ life were depicted by artists on ancient vases and frescoes (for example, in Pompeii).

Odysseus

(Ulysses) varied adventures after the Trojan War kept him away from Ithaca for ten years. [Gk. Myth.: Odyssey]

Odysseus

wily and noble hero of the Odyssey. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey]
See: Cunning

Odysseus

changed by Athena into an old beggar to avoid his recognition by Penelope’s suitors. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey]

Odysseus

wily teller of tales. [Gk. Legend: Odyssey]

Odysseus

(Ulysses) hero of the Trojan War wanders for seven years before returning home. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey]
References in periodicals archive ?
(5.) The source is Albricus, 4.6 [= Third Vatican Mythographer, 11.9]: "Per has [Sirenes] transiturus, Ulixes sociis aures cera obturavit, semet malo alligait, illesusque perttransivit" (When Ulysses was about to pass by these [Sirens], he stopped his companions' ears with wax, bound himself to the mast, and sailed by them unscathed).
(24.) Fulgentius, 2.8: "Ulixes...Sirenas, id est delectationum inlecebras, et audivit et vidit id est agnovit et iudicavit, et tamen transiit."
(25.) Third Vatican Mythographer, 11.9: "Per [Sirenes] transiturus Ulixes sociis aures cera obturavit, se malo alligavit illaesusque pertransiit....Sirenes igitur corporales illecebras evidenter designant....Sapiens autem aures suorum obturat, ne earum modulationes audiant, id est praeceptis eos salutaribus informat, ne saecularibus deliciis implicentur.
(26.) Honorius of Autun, 857 A: "Ulixes dicitur Sapiens.
(34.) Jerome, 1960, 119: "Sirenarum mortifero carmine, quae ut vitaret Ulixes Homericus, clausisse aures dicitur." Jerome refers to the siren song of the heretics.
40: "Exemplum ad hoc dicitur in fabulis, quod Ulixes transiturus per locum in mari, ubi Syrena in cantatione sua omnes transeuntes decepit, obturavit aures suas et sic periculum evasit.
20: "Sicut ergo Ulixes secundum fabulas transiturus per loca maritima ubi erat cantus Synenarum aure obturavit, ne cantus dulcedine delectaretur, et arbori navis se ligavit, ne ab eis quocunque modo deceptus ad mare raperetur, et sicut fugiens ad ecclesiam videns inimicos supervenire ad eum rapiendum crucifixum amplectitur: Ita quilibet nostrum per mare huius mundi navigaturus, aures et alios sensus claudat ab illicitis, ad Christum et crucem fugiat crucemque amplectatur." Owst, who points out the two exempla in Bromyarde, also mentions several other instances in medieval English sermons; see Owst, 186, with nn.2 and 4.