Ulpian


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Ulpian
NationalityRoman
Occupation
jurist

Ulpian

(Dometius Ulpianus) (ŭl`pēən), d. 228, Roman jurist. He was a member of the council of the jurist Papinian. As Praetorian prefect from 222, he enjoyed the favor of the emperor Alexander Severus, and he was murdered by the jealous Praetorian Guard. Ulpian's Libri ad edictum [edicts], a statement of the policy he would follow while in office, survives only in excerpts. Much of the Corpus Juris CivilisCorpus Juris Civilis
, most comprehensive code of Roman law and the basic document of all modern civil law. Compiled by order of Byzantine Emperor Justinian I, the first three parts appeared between 529 and 535 and were the work of a commission of 17 jurists presided over by the
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 is extracted from Ulpian's writings.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ulpian

 

(Domitius Ulpianus). Born circa 170; died 228. Roman jurist.

Ulpian’s views were influenced by the Stoic philosophers. He believed that slavery was a contradiction of natural law, but he justified it on the basis of custom developed among all peoples and fixed by civil law and the law of nations (jus gentium). Ulpian also substantiated the validity of the unlimited power of the Roman emperors. His best-preserved work is Liber singularisregularum (Book of Rules). Four hundred twenty-six of Ulpian’s writings, together with works by four other prominent jurists, were made legally binding by statute. Fragments of Ulpian’s works constitute about one-third of the main part of the Byzantine codification of law (seeDIGEST).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(18.) See Ulpian Fulwell, Like Wil to Like (London: Edward Allde, 1587); James Frazer, The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion, ed.
Among the topics are intellectual responses to Roman rule in the high empire, Luke-Acts stand towards Rome, Josephus and Tacitus on triumph and civil war, Ulpian of Tyre on the duties of the proconsul, Greek history in a Roman context: Arrian's Anabasis of Alexander, and images of elite community in a re-reading of the preface to Philostatus' Lives of the Sophists.
This may be part of the reason why his book follows something like a "great men" theory and tells the story through the contributions of Quintus Mucius, Servius, Cicero, Labeo, Gaius, Pomponius, and Ulpian, with others, such as Aulus Ofilius, in support.
"The expression being once brought in as subservient to the will, soon becomes the principal part of the promise." (37) On this view, contracts, like promises, are "human inventions, founded on the necessities and interests of society." (38) At least on the conceptual level, contract as convention has a strong continental tradition stretching from Ulpian and Pufendorf to the French Civil Code.
50.17.54 (Ulpian, Ad Edictum 46, translated in 2 THE DIGEST OF JUSTINIAN (Alan Watson trans., rev.
941,943 (1949) (reviewing READINGS IN AMERICAN LEGAL HISTORY (Mark De Wolfe Howe ed., 1949)) ("That the learned Chancellor has taken the famous three principles of Ulpian as a full and adequate guide to the common law, is an indication of a certain vagueness in the current understanding of the common law.').
Among the latter are, for example, two poems, 'A Commemoration of Queene Jane' and An Epitaph on the Death of Queene Jane', in Ulpian Fulwell's The Flower of Fame (1575), part of a sequence of verses on three of Henry VIII's queens; (4) as well as 'The Princely Song of the Six Queens that were married to Henry the Eighth, King of England', included in the 1659 edition of A Crowne-Garland of Golden Roses, ascribed to Richard Johnson (fl.
In a juristic comment on soldiers' testamentary rights, Ulpian (c.