Ulpian


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Ulpian
NationalityRoman
Occupation
jurist

Ulpian

(Dometius Ulpianus) (ŭl`pēən), d. 228, Roman jurist. He was a member of the council of the jurist Papinian. As Praetorian prefect from 222, he enjoyed the favor of the emperor Alexander Severus, and he was murdered by the jealous Praetorian Guard. Ulpian's Libri ad edictum [edicts], a statement of the policy he would follow while in office, survives only in excerpts. Much of the Corpus Juris CivilisCorpus Juris Civilis
, most comprehensive code of Roman law and the basic document of all modern civil law. Compiled by order of Byzantine Emperor Justinian I, the first three parts appeared between 529 and 535 and were the work of a commission of 17 jurists presided over by the
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 is extracted from Ulpian's writings.

Ulpian

 

(Domitius Ulpianus). Born circa 170; died 228. Roman jurist.

Ulpian’s views were influenced by the Stoic philosophers. He believed that slavery was a contradiction of natural law, but he justified it on the basis of custom developed among all peoples and fixed by civil law and the law of nations (jus gentium). Ulpian also substantiated the validity of the unlimited power of the Roman emperors. His best-preserved work is Liber singularisregularum (Book of Rules). Four hundred twenty-six of Ulpian’s writings, together with works by four other prominent jurists, were made legally binding by statute. Fragments of Ulpian’s works constitute about one-third of the main part of the Byzantine codification of law (seeDIGEST).

References in periodicals archive ?
38) At least on the conceptual level, contract as convention has a strong continental tradition stretching from Ulpian and Pufendorf to the French Civil Code.
1949)) ("That the learned Chancellor has taken the famous three principles of Ulpian as a full and adequate guide to the common law, is an indication of a certain vagueness in the current understanding of the common law.
Among the latter are, for example, two poems, 'A Commemoration of Queene Jane' and An Epitaph on the Death of Queene Jane', in Ulpian Fulwell's The Flower of Fame (1575), part of a sequence of verses on three of Henry VIII's queens; (4) as well as 'The Princely Song of the Six Queens that were married to Henry the Eighth, King of England', included in the 1659 edition of A Crowne-Garland of Golden Roses, ascribed to Richard Johnson (fl.
In a juristic comment on soldiers' testamentary rights, Ulpian (c.
86) Therefore, one of the greatest Roman jurists, Ulpian, can assert in the first fragment of the Digest that the jurists in their endeavor to realize justice strive for the true philosophy and not for a simulated one (veram nisi fallor philosophiam, non simulatam affectantes).
They cite Susan Treggiari, Roman Marriage: Iusti Coniuges from the Time of Cicero to the Time of Ulpian (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993).
The Roman jurist Ulpian declared that it is preferable to let a crime go unpunished than condemn an innocent person (satius est impunitum relinqui facinus nocentis quam innocentem damnari): every person accused of an offence is presumed innocent until his guilt is legally proclaimed in a final judgement by a judge, just as laid down by the European Convention of Human Rights (Art.
The Civil law, including the Twelve tables, the Institutes of Gaius, the Rules of Ulpian, the Opinions of Paulus, the Enactments of Justinian, and the Constitutions of Leo: translated from the original Latin, edited, and compared with all accessible systems of jurisprudence ancient and modern.
Despite all these, Ulpian, in the Supplements of the stipulations of this Law, in Digests 9, 2, 7, 4, points out some exclusion clauses regarding the primar, tort libility in sport activities.
10) For what follows see Philip Lyndon Reynolds, Marriage in the Western Church: The Christianization of Marriage during the Patristic Medieval Periods (New York: Brill, 1994) 1-412 (the patristic period through Augustine and the nuptial process); Susan Tregiari, Roman Marriage, Iusti Coniuges, from the time of Cicero to the Time of Ulpian (New York: Oxford University, 1991); Judith E.
2 Ulpian is at pains to stress that the condictio will lie no matter when the basis happened to fail; Africanus makes the same point in 7.