Ulysses


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Ulysses:

see OdysseusOdysseus
, Lat. Ulysses , in Greek mythology, son and successor of King Laertes of Ithaca. A leader of Greek forces during the Trojan War, Odysseus was noted (as in the Iliad) for his cunning strategy and his wise counsel.
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Ulysses

(yoo-liss -eez) A joint ESA/NASA mission to study for the first time the properties of the interplanetary medium and solar wind away from the plane of the ecliptic and over the polar regions of the Sun. The ESA spacecraft was launched by NASA in Oct. 1990, toward Jupiter. It encountered Jupiter in Feb. 1992, approaching close over the north pole then swinging under the south pole, and the gravity of the massive planet accelerated the probe out of the ecliptic plane into a polar orbit of the Sun; the inclination of its orbit to the ecliptic is in fact 80°. (No rocket has sufficient thrust to launch a probe directly into such an orbit.) It passed under the Sun's south pole in May 1994 and over the north pole in May 1995, crossing the ecliptic in Feb. 1995. Its nine scientific instruments took measurements throughout the mission. They measured the solar wind from the Sun's polar regions at both solar maximum and minimum, they studied the interplanetary magnetic field and found that the magnetic flux emanating from the Sun is the same at all latitudes, and they discovered ‘pools' of energetic particles surrounding the Sun. Ulysses also discovered the presence of interstellar dust in the Solar System, measured cosmic rays flowing into the Solar System, made the first measurement of interstellar helium atoms in the Solar System, and analyzed solar X-rays, radio waves and plasma waves, and Jupiter's magnetosphere. Ulysses' mission continued throughout the 1990s and early 2000s and was extended several times; the latest extension, announced in 2004, continued Ulysses' operation up to 2008.

Ulysses

Joyce novel long banned in U.S. for its sexual frankness. [Irish Lit.: Benét, 1037]
References in classic literature ?
At last, when the swinish uproar resounded through the palace, and when he saw the image of a hog in the marble basin, he thought it best to hasten back to the vessel, and inform the wise Ulysses of these marvelous occurrences.
Then he told Ulysses all that had happened, as far as he knew it, and added that he suspected the beautiful woman to be a vile enchantress, and the marble palace, magnificent as it looked, to be only a dismal cavern in reality.
As I am your king," answered Ulysses, "and wiser than any of you, it is therefore the more my duty to see what has befallen our comrades, and whether anything can yet be done to rescue them.
But King Ulysses frowned sternly on them, and shook his spear, and bade them stop him at their peril.
It happened to Ulysses, just as before, that, when he had gone a few steps from the edge of the cliff, the purple bird came fluttering towards him, crying, "Peep, peep, pe--weep
But Ulysses had no time to waste in trying to get at the mystery.
Ulysses had been looking at that very spot only just before; and it appeared to him that the plant had burst into full flower the instant when Quicksilver touched it with his fingers.
After listening attentively, Ulysses thanked his good friend, and resumed his way.
When they reached the place where they had killed Hector's scout, Ulysses stayed his horses, and the son of Tydeus, leaping to the ground, placed the blood-stained spoils in the hands of Ulysses and remounted: then he lashed the horses onwards, and they flew forward nothing loth towards the ships as though of their own free will.
Tell me," said he, "renowned Ulysses, how did you two come by these horses?
And Ulysses answered, "Nestor son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, heaven, if it so will, can give us even better horses than these, for the gods are far mightier than we are.
When they reached the strongly built quarters of the son of Tydeus, they tied the horses with thongs of leather to the manger, where the steeds of Diomed stood eating their sweet corn, but Ulysses hung the blood-stained spoils of Dolon at the stern of his ship, that they might prepare a sacred offering to Minerva.