understory

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understory

[′ən·dər‚stȯr·ē]
(forestry)
A foliage layer occurring beneath and shaded by the main canopy of a forest.
References in periodicals archive ?
They were widespread throughout the Prom, resulting in reasonable sample sizes, and they represented understorey and ground cover plants respectively.
Lead author Kieran Withey of Lancaster University said, "Uncontrolled understorey wildfires in humid tropical forests during extreme droughts are a large and poorly quantified source of CO2 emissions.
aspera and other understorey species may be subjected to a wide range of levels of bioturbation, from very little to extreme.
Jamalun (2002).Comparison of understorey bird species composition in a primary and logged mixed hill dipterocarp forest in peninsular Malaysia.
sylvatica in upper canopies, representing less than half of the SLA values that were found for the tree species in the understorey of forest stands [27].
The intensity of understorey growth is usually driven by the magnitude of canopy disturbance caused by the particular type of management intervention (Ujhazy et al.
Dominated by mature Sessile oak and ash and featuring an understorey of coppiced hazel and climbing honeysuckle, Strawberry Cottage Wood is perfect habitat for the elusive hazel dormouse.
Effects of trees and understorey management on soil fertility and nutritional status of holm oaks in Spanish dehesas Nutr Cycl Agroecosyst 78 253-264.
Mechanisms of interaction between a leguminous shrub and its understorey in a semiarid environment.
"The creation of these 'understorey' planting spaces is particularly useful for short, springflowering perennials and bulbs." He adds that compact sub-shrubs - rarely more than a metre in height with a dense, twiggy branching habit and very small leaves - such as Hebe albicans, lavender and silvery Artemisia pontica, are invaluable to gardeners.
designer Kingsbury "The creation of these 'understorey' planting spaces is particularly useful for short, springflowering perennials and bulbs." He adds that compact sub-shrubs - rarely more than a metre in height with a dense, twiggy branching habit and very small leaves - such as Hebe albicans, lavender and silvery Artemisia pontica, are invaluable to gardeners.