principle of uniformity

(redirected from Uniformity of nature)

principle of uniformity

[′prin·sə·pəl əv ‚yü·nə′fȯr·məd·ē]
(geology)
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As Bertrand Russell pointed out: "The man who has fed the chicken every day throughout its life at last wrings its neck instead, showing that more refined views as to the uniformity of nature would have been useful to the chicken.
As Bertrand Russell pointed out, "The man who has fed the chicken every day throughout its life at last wrings its neck instead, showing that more refined views as to the uniformity of nature would have been useful to the chicken.
These values help bond scientists despite deep-seated differences as to the meaning of, say, the uniformity of nature.
The author argues that CliffordAEs arguments regarding evidentialism and the assumption of the uniformity of nature need supplementation, and that JamAEs argument regarding will-to-believe and his reconstructed account of religious belief are widely misconstrued.
If the [PSI]/[PHI] distinction were to be taken, not only as cognitively necessary for mental processes, but also as the ontological architecture that supports the principle of the uniformity of nature ("all the elements of the physical world are also mental," p.
For any attempt to confirm the principle of the uniformity of nature is question-begging.
The journey touches on the Western view of the world before 1500, searching for a new philosophy of nature, from Aristotelian cosmology to the uniformity of nature, creating a new philosophy of nature, from mixed mathematics to mathematical physics, alchemy and chemistry, studying life, and Newton on gravity and God.
For example, there is no logical contradiction in assenting to the uniformity of nature while denying one can tell whether or not it is true (a la David Hume); however, assenting to the uniformity of nature does M-imply that one believes that this uniformity truly obtains (24).
The contradictions of adversarial testimony were deeply frustrating, but, as Sir James Fitzjames Stephen wrote in 1863, the trial of truth still rested on two great pillars, "the general uniformity of nature and the general trustworthiness of the senses.
Time cannot have a causal effect on a reflexive relation of equality because the passing of time cannot change a reflexive relation of equality, and this is the origin of the scientific and scholastic principle of the uniformity of nature.
The young Kant sought to bring peace to three major fronts on the battlefield between physics and metaphysics by showing that an empirically coherent, mechanistic worldview need not reject the uniformity of nature, the purposiveness of history, or the reality of human freedom.
Here the uniformity assumption has been divided into the eight metaphysical theses that stand above fundamental physical theories in the hierarchy described above, a move designed to avoid the standard problem that a single uniformity of nature assumption ends up being either too specific to be justified independently of the inferences it is supposed to license, or too vague or contentless to license them.