Unionidae

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Unionidae

[‚yü·nē′än·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The fresh-water mussels, a family of bivalve mollusks in the subclass Eulamellibranchia; the larvae, known as glochidia, are parasitic on fish.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, among the fish that consumed unionid mussels (n = 15), eight were captured in lotic habitats and seven in lentic habitats, indicating that black carp fed on mussels in both environments.
Table 2 A summary of the live Unionid mussel species found in the Middle Cuyahoga River and in 3 sites above Lake Rockwell; no mussels were found below the Gorge (Lower Cuyahoga River).
A Report on the Results of a Survey for Unionid Mussels on the Upper and Middle Big Sioux River and Tributaries: Grant, Codington, Hamlin, Brookings, and Moody counties, South Dakota.
All species of North American unionid mussels must undergo an obligatory parasitism of specific hosts in order to metamorphose from glochidia into free-living juveniles (Bogan and Roe, 2008).
(79) See Bogan Interview, supra note 33 (stating that it is unclear whether Asian clams are having a negative competitive impact on native freshwater mussels); Cummings Interview, supra note 54 (stating that the impact of Asian clams is "almost zero"); Hartfield Interview, supra note 33 ("[The Service] can't point to a single instance of Asian clams moving Unionid mussels out."); Koch Interview, supra note 54 ("[F]reshwater mussels can make it alongside Corbicula assuming river conditions stabilize or improve.").
The small size and the presence of only soft tissue made the identification of unionid mussels to the species level from stomachs of the round goby impossible under a dissection scope.
Several native unionid mussels are "drum specialists." This means that these mussels expose themselves from the substrate to be preyed upon by freshwater drum as a strategy to get their larvae into contact with the gill filaments of the host fish.
The information that is gathered during surveys such as these is an invaluable tool for monitoring and preserving the status of unionid mussels in North Dakota.
Importance of physical and hydraulic characteristics to Unionid mussels: a retrospective analysis in a large river reach.
Further investigation of the mussel populations is needed to create a long term data set for Hannah Creek which will better explain the status of the unionid mussels. The mussel populations in Hannah Creek appear to suffer from decreased reproduction recently, but more effective methods for locating juvenile mussels are needed to accurately assess the status of the mussel populations and any need for protection or restoration.