union

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Union,

industrial township (1990 pop. 50,024), Union co., NE N.J.; settled 1749 by colonists from Connecticut, set off from Elizabethtown 1808. Steel and metal products and paint are among its various manufactures. Union was the site of a Revolutionary battle in 1780. It is the seat of Kean Univ. of New Jersey.

Union

 

a political unit formed by joining monarchical states under the crown of one sovereign.

In state law, two types of union are distinguished—personal and organic. A personal union may arise whenever, as a result of dynastic ties and the order of succession, one person becomes the monarch of two or more states; in this way, for example, England and Hanover were joined in a union from 1714 to 1837. States joined in a personal union retain their own sovereignty, and the power of the monarch is nominal.

An organic union may be formed on the basis of a treaty, as in the case of the union of Sweden and Norway from 1814 to 1905, or it may be imposed by a stronger state on a weaker one, as in the case of the union of Austria and Hungary from 1867 to 1918 or the union of Denmark and Iceland from 1918 to 1944. In international relations, an organic union acts as a single sovereign state.

union

[′yün·yən]
(computer science)
A data structure that can store items of different types, but can store only one item at a time.
(design engineering)
A screwed or flanged pipe coupling usually in the form of a ring fitting around the outside of the joint.
(mathematics)
A union of a given family of sets is a set consisting of those elements that are members of at least one set in the family. Also known as join.
For two fuzzy sets A and B, the fuzzy set whose membership function has a value at any element x that is the maximum of the values of the membership functions of A and B at x.
The union of two Boolean matrices A and B, with the same number of rows and columns, is the Boolean matrix whose element cij in row i and column j is the union of corresponding elements aij in A and bij in B.
The union of two graphs is the graph whose set of vertices is the union of the sets of vertices of the two graphs, and whose set of edges is the union of the sets of edges of the two graphs.

union

union
A pipe fitting, 1 used to connect the ends of two pipes, neither of which can be turned; consists of three pieces, the two end pieces (having inner threads), which are tightened around the pipe ends to be joined, and a center piece, which draws the two end pieces together as it is rotated, effecting a seal. Also see flange union.

union

1. an association, alliance, or confederation of individuals or groups for a common purpose, esp political
2. a device on a flag representing union, such as another flag depicted in the top left corner
3. a device for coupling or linking parts, such as pipes
4. 
a. an association of students at a university or college formed to look after the students' interests, provide facilities for recreation, etc.
b. the building or buildings housing the facilities of such an organization
5. Maths a set containing all members of two given sets. Symbol: ∪, as in A∪B
6. in 19th-century England
a. a number of parishes united for the administration of poor relief
b. a workhouse supported by such a combination
7. Textiles a piece of cloth or fabric consisting of two different kinds of yarn

Union

the
1. Brit
a. the union of England and Wales from 1543
b. the union of the English and Scottish crowns (1603--1707)
c. the union of England and Scotland from 1707
d. the political union of Great Britain and Ireland (1801--1920)
e. the union of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from 1920
2. US
a. the United States of America
b. the northern states of the US during the Civil War
c. (as modifier): Union supporters

union

(set theory)
An operation on two sets which returns the set of all elements that are a member of either or both of the argument sets; normally written as an infix upper-case U symbol. The operator generalises to zero or more sets by taking the union of the current partial result (initially the empty set) with the next argument set, in any order.

For example, (a, b, c) U (c, d, e) = (a, b, c, d, e)

union

(programming)
A type whose values may be of one of a number of other types, thet current type depending on conditions that are only known at run-time. A variable of union type must be allocated sufficient storage space to hold the largest component type. Some unions include extra information to say which type of value the union currently has (a "tagged union"), others rely on the program to keep track of this independently.

A union contrasts with a structure or record which stores values of all component types at once.

union

(database)
An SQL operator that concatenates two result sets, that must have the same number and types of columns. The operator may be followed by the word "ALL" to indicate that results that appear in both sets should appear twice in the output.

union

The joining of two files in a relational database. See set theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unions are astute at taking advantage of weak supervisors and at selling the "need" for representation to employees who are at odds with their supervisors, even if they can't attract the employees for any other reason.
Usually, unions will seek to include permissive subjects, thereby increasing their influence over the workplace; management resists inclusion of items that they regard as their prerogatives.
As Robert Barkley, former executive director of the Ohio Education Association, explained, "The fundamental and legitimate purposes of unions [are] to protect the employment interests of their members.
That breakaway has not affected - so far - groups such as the County Federation, through which the various unions have joined forces for years on political issues.
The Canadian Labour Congress brings together Canada's national and international unions, the provincial and territorial federations of labour and 137 district labour councils.
Americans have largely left the Iraqi unions to fend for themselves, and in some cases actively undercut them.
She goes on to argue that the type and amount &media coverage forms the basis for public opinion about unions and the greatest impact is on those with weak opinions.
5) While these accounts all agree that organized crime came to play a growing role in the affairs of certain unions in the 1930s, they have little to say about how or why that happened.
It has been seven years since the Union of Ontario Indians first began exploring the possibility of creating the first financial institution in Ontario made up entirely of Aboriginal peoples.
Through their unions, working people can work together to make their communities better for everyone.