unit testing

(redirected from Unit tests)

unit testing

(testing)
The type of testing where a developer (usually the one who wrote the code) proves that a code module (the "unit") meets its requirements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unit Test Framework for creating unit tests for the services, included in Continuous Integration for build verification.
* Unit Testing - Create and run unit tests, regress tests; automate stub creation; cope with code changes; run a white box test; maintain and document unit tests.
If we have an system based on sensors with Arduino board, we can use ArduinoUnit to develop unit tests [22].
In each study, students in two of the four sections were required to use Cacoo, a free online resource, to construct concept maps of specified complex concepts that were assessed within unit tests.
"For the compiler developer, SuperTest uses VectorCAST to examine the internal structure of the compiler to highlight points where unit tests need to be developed.
The new integration will allow organizations to improve the quality of apps by enabling efficient collaboration between quality assurance (QA) practitioners doing end-to-end testing and developers automating unit tests.
Someone (presumably another developer, or a "tester", or the modern mix of the two an "SDET") has already coded automated test cases called "unit tests" and checked them into the same system.
For the control group, which was taught using traditional methods, the instructor recorded student performance using three unit tests and a comprehensive final exam.
He focuses mostly on unit tests, but many of the techniques he describes can also be applied to higher level tests.
The unit tests flow function, time consolidation, wall friction and bulk density.
He gets stars for his good work in the class regularly and also got first rank in his unit tests," she said.
The major components of PSI are: (a) instructor-selected textbooks and other textual material; (b) study questions based on the assigned material, (c) student self-pacing; (b) clear study objectives; (c) stress on the written word; (d) textual material divided into small study units; (e) demonstration of mastery of one study unit of material before proceeding to the next study unit; (f) use of more advanced students (typically in another course) to administer unit tests and provide immediate feedback; and (g) use of lectures for motivational purposes as opposed to providing new information.