Unix commands


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Related to Unix commands: Unix shell scripting

Unix commands

Unix was developed as a command line interface in the early 1970s with a very rich command vocabulary. DOS followed more than a decade later for the IBM PC, and DOS commands migrated to Windows. Although DOS/Windows commands cover the basics, the command set was never as elaborate as Unix. Microsoft later added a more comprehensive command language for Windows (see PowerShell).

Linux and Mac Are Unix Based
Linux, as well as Mac OS X, are based on Unix and use the same command line syntax (see terminal). Unix text is generally case sensitive, which means "abC" is not the same as "ABc." DOS/Windows text is not however, and "abC" and "ABc" are equal. Following is a brief comparison of common Unix/Linux commands and their DOS/Windows counterparts.

FILE/FOLDEROPERATION     UNIX   DOS/WINDOWS

 Change **
  directory    cd      cd

 Create **
  directory    mkdir   mkdir, md

 Remove **
  directory    rmdir   rmdir, rd

 List file
  names        ls      dir

 Copy file     cp      copy

 Delete file   rm      del

 Rename file   mv      ren

 Display file
  contents     cat     type

 Print file    lpr     print

  ** A "directory" is a folder.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rest of this paper is organized as follows: Section 2 reviews the related work that has been published previously in the area of masquerade detection using traditional machine learning methods and UNIX command line datasets.
All of the usual DOS commands are at your disposal, along with some familiar Unix commands that help all users including programmers get more done with less effort.
SOME USEFUL UNIX COMMANDS AND THEIR DOS EQUIVALENTS
It shields the user from arcane Unix commands. The archetypal browser is Mosaic, developed by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications.
FTP files that are not found through Gopher must be accessed using UNIX commands, but an Archie server--a database of all the FTP files on the Internet--will at least tell you where to look.
Robert Glasier, "The high-level graphical interface of Looking Glass allows users to concentrate on the engineering processes at hand and shields them from the complexities of the operating system." This icon-driven graphical interface provides not only a visual representation of Unix commands, but also a more intuitive method of managing files and directories, launching applications, and manipulating the Unix environment.