Unix to Unix Copy

Unix to Unix Copy

(networking, messaging)
(uucp) A Unix utility program and protocol that allows one Unix system to send files to another via a serial line which may be a cable going directly from one machine's serial port to another's or may involve a modem at each end of a telephone line.

Software is also available to allow uucp to work over Ethernet though there are better alternatives in this case, e.g. FTP or rcp for file transfer, SMTP for electronic mail or NNTP for news.

The term is now also used to describe the large international network which uses UUCP to pass Usenet news and electronic mail, also known as "UUCPNET".

Unix manual page: uucp(1).

See also cu, uuencode.

UUCP

(UNIX to UNIX CoPy) A Unix utility that copies a file from one computer to another. It was widely used for mail transfer. Unlike TCP/IP, which is a routable communications protocol, UUCP provides a point-to-point transmission where a user at one Unix computer dials up and establishes a session with another Unix computer. See bang path.
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In 1979, graduate students at Duke and at the University of North Carolina concocted a scheme for exchanging information among UNIX aficionados using the "UNIX to UNIX Copy Protocol." UNIX developed into a global discussion medium whose content was shared over the Internet using NNTP (Network News Transfer Protocol).
This release came with a new program called UUCP (Unix to Unix copy) that could be used to send files between machines over modems.