Untermenschen

Untermenschen

subhumans; Nazi conception of Jews and Slays. [Ger. Hist.: Shirer, 1223]
References in periodicals archive ?
Notions of 'racial superiority' which asserted the dominance of the 'Aryan race' under the umbrella of scientific legitimacy aimed at the extermination of those they saw as Untermenschen (sub-humans), and finally culminated in the Holocaust.
The church is divided into Ubermenschen (clergy) and Untermenschen (laity).
This shows them to be subhuman, "Untermenschen", just as the Nazis regarded the Jews.
Reviling the hobbits as "little fools" (VT8.1004) is the equivalent the Nazis contempt for "Untermenschen," or "sub-human." The designation of the occupying men as "ruffians" recalls the Nazi thugs who roamed German streets with weapons similar to the "whips, knives, and clubs" (1009) now wielded by the ruffians in the Shire.
He decreed that pure morality sought "the euthanasia of Judaism".' (27) It is then easy to see why Hitler liked Kant's philosophy, and strove to literally write off the Jews, Slavic Peoples, the Roma Gypsies, the Blacks, and other Untermenschen of Europe, from both 'civilisation' and humanity, and proceeded to exterminate them all in the infamous 'Final Solution'.
But can we also make some space in our collective conscience for the other victims of the Holocaust as the Nazis sought to eliminate those they deemed to be subhuman, the so-called Untermenschen, from the Third Reich?
(33) The Germans, following Hitler's doctrine for a war of extermination against Untermenschen (subhumans), provided no quarter to Russian soldiers or civilians in their push toward Moscow.
The Nazi regime became Germany's unstoppable monster, animated by Adolf Hitler's ideology of Aryan supremacy, a racial theory that told the world: 'All Jews were untermenschen (subhuman).' It was the basis for the murder of Jews, defective children in the womb, the comatose, inutile grandparents in the home of the aged, prisoners in the death row, etc.
In 1935, the Nuremberg Laws classified Jews to be "untermenschen," that is "inferior people," and deprived them of their citizenship and rights.
If there was one group of doctors who paid no attention to the first principle of the Hippocratic Oath, "First, do no harm,'' it would be the doctors in the Nazi death camps who aided and abetted the murder of some 6 million Jews and other untermenschen (undesirables) during World War II.
The narrator describes a proud German woman, the fiancee of a member of the SS and the very image of the blond Aryan, who "looked a little askance at the Untermenschen" (81):