anabatic wind

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anabatic wind

[¦an·ə¦bad·ik ′wind]
(meteorology)
An upslope wind; usually applied only when the wind is blowing up a hill or mountain as the result of a local surface heating, and apart from the effects of the larger-scale circulation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

anabatic wind

anabatic windclick for a larger image
Anabatic wind.
A local wind that flows up the side of the valleys resulting from increased heating along the valley walls. Often anabatic wind results in cumulus clouds along the ridges on either side of the valley. These winds are the opposite of katabatic winds. Anabatic winds are typically daytime winds during summer. Also referred to as valley breeze.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
In the morning, heating of the ground generates turbulent convection, and stable stratification is destroyed through a complex sequence of processes, leading to upslope flow and subsidence in the valley (Princevac and Fernando 2008).
The snapped culvert location, in combination with the flow direction output, provides input for the ArcMap Flow Length tool to calculate the longest upslope flow path from the culvert or pour point.
It may also form from extensive lift of a very humid air mass due to upslope flow, which is common in the Great Plains, or lift along a warm front.
Persson, "The statistical relationship between upslope flow and rainfall in California's coastal mountains: observations during CALJET," Monthly Weather Review, vol.
The latter was revealed through case studies centered on the Selwyn Basin in the Yukon Territory, where surface exposure of black shales generates stream sediments with high THg concentrations while downstream sediment THg concentrations decrease with increasing upslope flow accumulation areas [3].
The Edwards Plateau in Texas and southward along the Sierra Madre Mountains in Mexico acts as a barrier as the arctic air near the surface is differentially advected parallel to, diverted around, and enhanced by differential upslope flow relative to the terrain.
Fog may also develop in upslope flow on rising terrain and mountains from forced lifting and adiabatic cooling.
Thunderstorms in Southern California tend to initially form along mountain ridges as upslope flow generates a convergence zone at or near the ridgeline.
The Great Plains slope upward and to the west, which means that any easterly component to the surface winds favors upslope flow. This produces adiabatic lift, and favors clouds, fog, and even light precipitation if the air-mass humidity is high enough.
Upslope flow may separate on the slopes in the form of thermal plumes, topped by cumulus clouds (Banta 1984; Hocut et al.
[37] stated that the probability of upslope flow occurring on any single day at a subalpine forest site was 40-60% during 1999, with the peak in August and minimum in May.
Strong convergence along with enhanced southeasterly winds (see the supplemental information) were present on the north side of the circulation, and a band of relatively deep convection developed within this region of enhanced upslope flow (Fig.