urban area

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urban area

An area which is within the city limits, or closely linked to it by common use of public utilities or services.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
They covered both the economic functions of river valleys and selected elements of the natural environment in urbanized areas. It was noticed that due to their unique natural wealth, large water supplies and the role of main natural ecological corridors, rivers play a key role in the functioning of the whole ecological system of the country, region and city.
Common Mynas were the most numerous in highly urbanized areas (fig 9 and table 1.9).
Communities eligible for the federal urbanized area formula funding program, available to urbanized areas with populations between 50,000 and 200,000 in population, would lose their eligibility if they were now considered part of a larger metropolitan area more than 250,000 in population.
MS4s are publicly owned drainage systems, including storm drains, pipes and ditches, designed to collect and convey stormwater runoff in urbanized areas.
Cundiff said the town has to comply because of its urbanized areas with population densities greater than 100,000 people per square mile.
It is neither within the heart of the city nor outside urbanized areas but aesthetically inferior, although he never defines by what criteria.
* Exceed other states' programs to keep Michigan on top of competition for economic development of urbanized areas.
In addition to legal cities, we also construct a series of urbanized areas from the Number of Inhabitants publication.
The New Sunbelt region encompasses expanding communities in the South and West that lie outside dense, urbanized areas. The Heartland region includes some 29 states that do not see high levels of migration and, for the most part, are older and less diverse.
"In urban areas, anywhere from thirty to forty percent of the rainfall runs right into whatever stream is in the area, and in heavily urbanized areas it can be more than fifty percent," he explains (by comparison, he says, the amount of runoff in subsaturated woodlands is often less than 5%).
However, the uniqueness of this text is the focus on the effects of population shifts from more urbanized areas to rural areas.
Because impervious surfaces typically absorb more solar radiation than natural ones do, the water entering streams in urbanized areas can be as much as 6[degrees]C warmer than it would be if the area were undeveloped.