Uritskii

Uritskii

 

an urban-type settlement and the administrative center of Uritskii Raion, Kustanai Oblast, Kazakh SSR. Located in the eastern part of the oblast, Uritskii is on the Kustanai-Petropavlovsk highway, 6 km from the Novouritsk railroad station on the Kustanai-Kokchetav line. The settlement has a combine for the manufacture of building and assembly materials, a butter factory, and a grain elevator.

References in periodicals archive ?
Layton puts forward the hypothesis that the Soviet steamship Uritskii could have been the source of these radio transmissions.
Independently of any encounter at sea, the voyage of Uritskii also plays a vital role in Layton's complex theory that the Soviets knew of the Japanese plans in advance.
In 1990, Michael Slackman went farther, claiming without reservation that the ship "of a third nation" encountered on 5 December (Hawaii time) was in fact Uritskii, citing Agawa and Layton as his sources.
Another author, though he actually refuted the role of Uritskii as a candidate for an encounter, is relevant because he introduced a new ship into the scenario, the tanker Azerbaidzhan.
(13) He does not mention Uritskii, though he cites Layton as a source.
Three Soviet ships have been suggested for a potential encounter with the lapanese: Uritskii, Uzbekistan, and Azerbaidzhan.
(19) It is clear now that Layton and Slackman, in advancing the case for Uritskii intercepting the Japanese, and that Stinnett, in refuting that contention, were in fact chasing a red herring--it was not Uritskii but Uzbekistan, along with Azerbaidzhan, that the Japanese were worried about.
The four ships that sailed in this interval were Uritskii, Azerbaidzhan, Uzbekistan--all mentioned previously--and the timber carrier Clara Zetkin.
Uritskii wrote in the May 24, 1926 issue of Krest'ianskaia gazeta that the persecution of sel'kory had not ceased, but taken new forms:
But whereas Iakovlev appeared to have seen the lines of communication between party and peasant as operating smoothly, Uritskii repeated the observation that the peasants often lacked faith in the newspapers as the writers tended to gloss over problems that the peasants saw as central.
Uritskii, "Nuzhno dvinut'sia vpered," Krasnaia pechat', no.
Uritskii, "Gotov'tes' ko dniu pechati, chto takoe 'Krest'ianskaia gazeta' i v chemee naznachenie," Kresr,ianskaia gazeta, April 27, 1926.