Utagawa Toyokuni


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Utagawa Toyokuni

 

Born 1769 in Edo (present-day Tokyo); died there 1825. Japanese graphic artist and painter of the ukiyo-e school.

Utagawa Toyokuni was influenced by Kitagawa Utamaro. He became famous for his series of wood-block prints Portraits of Actors in Their Various Roles (1793-94), which portrays with great skill the actors’ poses and gestures and other aspects of the theater. Utagawa Toyokuni’s works are characterized by a flowing narrative quality and stylized grace. In addition to theatrical scenes, his works also include many wood-block prints depicting geishas.

References in periodicals archive ?
Potter's The Colour of Rome (1909) and William Loftie's The Colour of London (1914, figure 4) owe more to the watercolours of the French Impressionists than to the likes of Utagawa Toyokuni or Toyohara Kunichika.
Around the age of 12, his notable drawing skills garnered him an invitation to apprentice with the master artist Utagawa Toyokuni.
The influence of the school expanded with the popularity of the expressive paintings of Kabuki actors by Toyoharu's disciple, Utagawa Toyokuni (who took his master's surname as a sign of respect).