bicornuate uterus

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Related to Uterine malformation: uterine anomaly

bicornuate uterus

[bī′kȯr·yə‚nāt ′yüd·ə·rəs]
(anatomy)
A uterus with two horn-shaped processes on the superior aspect.
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides the classic phenotype previously described, several birth defects have been reported to occur in persons with RSTS; however, congenital uterine malformations are not typically known to be associated with the syndrome.
MDCT-HSG had a diagnostic accuracy of 100% for detecting fibroids and congenital uterine malformations. Sensitivity, specificity, NPV and PPV were all 100%.
In inpatients with uterine malformation, the three most common diagnoses were septate uterus (382 cases, 53.7%), didelphys (87 cases, 12.2%), and bicornuate uterus (65 cases, 9.1%).
The finding of cervical prolapse in a pregnant patient at term, particularly in a nulligravid patient, should prompt evaluation for a uterine malformation. In this case, the uterine anomaly was diagnosed at term after finding cervical prolapse and a pelvic mass.
One-sided spasmodic dysmenorrhea in a young girl should always raise the suspicion of uterine malformation, and every effort should be made to exclude this condition by conducting relevant investigations.
Among the overall incidence of uterine malformation which varies from 0.16%-10%, the incidence of bicornuate uterus noted in Stompe-Sorensen (1988) study is 1.2% of 167 women undergoing laparoscopic steralisation.
Incidence of spontaneous abortion, cervical incompetence, PPROM, fetal loss, IUGR, preterm delivery, mal presentation, caesarean section, retained placenta and PPH are all increased when uterine malformation are present.
Sonohysterosalpingography can show evidence of uterine synechiae or confirm uterine malformation. Arcuate uterus can also be diagnosed.
The incidence of mullerian duct malformations in the general population is estimated to be 4.3% [1] Rudimentary horn pregnancy occurs in approximately 1/76 000 to 1/150 000 pregnancies.[2,3] In a review article, Nahum reported that congenital uterine anomalies affected approximately 1 in 200 women.[3] In such cases, the walls of the abnormal uteri tend to become abnormally thin as pregnancy advances, and the thickness can be inconsistent over different aspects of the myometrium.[2] Uterus bicornis unicollis (bicornuate uterus), which is a common type seen represents a uterine malformation where the uterus is present as a paired organ resulting from the failure of the embryogenic fusion of the cranial part of the mullerian ducts.
These conditions may include vaginal delivery after previous cesarean section, previous uterine surgery or curettage, congenital uterine malformations, prolonged oxytocin induction, and retroflexion uterus due to adhesions (20).
Clinical implications of uterine malformations and hysteroscopic treatment results.
Uterine malformations are rare occurrences worldwide and surgical management of these cases is not well documented in Sub-Saharan Africa perhaps due to challenges in diagnosis or treatment.