Utnapishtim


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Utnapishtim

 

the hero of a Babylonian myth about the flood. According to legend, Utnapishtim built an ark and was saved from the great flood, the story of which is partly related to actual floods that occurred in Mesopotamia before the building of a flood control system in the late third millennium B.C. Utnapishtim corresponds to Ziusudra in Sumerian mythology and to Noah in biblical mythology.

Utnapishtim

blessed by Enlil with everlasting life. [Babyl. Myth.: Gilgamesh]
References in periodicals archive ?
Gilgamesh begs Utnapishtim to show him a way to conquer death with these supplicating words, 'Is there something more than death?
En la epica de Gilgamesh, el heroe lleva el nombre de Utnapishtim.
Sin embargo, despues del sacrificio de Utnapishtim en la cima de una montana, tanto Isthar como Ea estigmatizaron a Enlil con el autentico autor de este inesperado desastre:
The names of Gilgamesh, Enkidu, Utnapishtim, Enlil, and E anna are virtually unknown outside the poem itself.
This is a far cry from the earlier accounts (in the Gilgamesh and Atrahasis epics) where the gods plan the destruction of the world for reasons that are unclear, and where the protagonist, Utnapishtim, is saved as the result of a god's favoritism without any moral judgments being passed.
FaceOff's work, which draws on ancient myths and legends, replaces Noah with Utnapishtim, who is granted immortality by the Gods for saving two of every animal.
After Engidu's death Gilgamesh receives from Utnapishtim the secret--a magic plant--only to lose it on his homeward journey.
The most famous flood narrative, that of Noah, is based closely on the far older Babylonian story of Utnapishtim, told in the Epic of Gilgamesh.
38) The parallel proposed by Wensinck is consistent with his suggestion that the encounter between Moses and the Servant of God in Q 18:65 is reminiscent of that between Gilgamesh and Utnapishtim in the Epic (11).
Como ya hemos estudiado en otra sede (4), la tradicion sobre el rapto de Enoc es una reelaboracion de la que cuenta el destino del heroe del diluvio, sea Utnapishtim (en el poema de Guilgames) o Ziusudra (en el relato sumerio).
He disposed of the stone monster of Kumarbi when it threatened heaven; he alone of the gods found the means to save Ishtar from the underworld; and he saved mankind from the flood by warning Utnapishtim to build his ark, as explained in the Epic of Gilgamesh.
In tablet nine of the epic of Gilgamesh, for instance, the hero reaches the two mountains of Meshu, where the scorpion men guarding the area tell him that no mortal has reached this place before and explain to him that the way to get to Utnapishtim is via an underground route that leads him to a paradisiacal region.