Utricularia


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Related to Utricularia: genus Utricularia, Nepenthes

Utricularia

 

(bladderwort), a genus of insectivorous plants of the family Lentibulariaceae. The plants live in water and swamps; some are epiphytes. Bladderworts have no roots owing to their insectivorous mode of feeding and, for many of them, their aquatic life. The leaves are divided into thin threadlike lobes that end in small bladders for trapping small aquatic animals. On the free end of each bladder there is an opening with a valve that only opens inward; bristles are situated along the edge of the opening. Even the slightest pressure on the valve exerted by an animal will cause the valve to open. The insect enters the bladder and is digested there through the action of enzymes secreted by the bladder walls. Aquatic bladderworts flower, and their racemes are above water. Bladderworts develop winter buds, which serve for overwintering. There are approximately 250 species. Of the four species growing in the USSR, the best known are the greater bladderwort (U. vulgaris) and the intermediate bladderwort (U. intermedia). Some species have medicinal value.

References in periodicals archive ?
Among aquatic plants, the sequences of chloroplast genome have been accomplished for Nuphar advena [53], Najas flexilis [54], Elodea canadensis [55], Utricularia foliosa [56], Lemna minor [57], and three other species in different genera of the Lemnoideae--Spirodela polyrhiza, Wolffiella lingulata, and Wolffia australiana [58].
Utricularia carnivory revisited: plants supply photosynthetic carbon to traps.
The clues lie in the genome of the carnivorous bladderwort plant, Utricularia gibba.
The clue is in the carnivorous bladderwort plant, Utricularia gibba's genome.
In 1957 macrophyte assemblages in the northern part of the lake were characterized by dominance of charophytes and presence of Ranunculus circinatus Sibth., Utricularia vulgaris L., Elodea canadensis Michx., Potamogeton praelongus Wulfen, and Myriophyllum verticillatum L.
carolinensis, Intestine Marmota monax Contracaecum Lepomis gulosus Viscera spiculigerum Cosmoseralla Hyla cinerea Colon haberi Crenosoma gobeli Procyon lotor Lungs Cruzia Didelphis virginana Intestine tentaculata Dichelyna Ameiurus melas, Intestine robustus Ictalurus Anguilla Dirofilaria Canis latrans Heart imitis Dracunculus Procyon lotor Skin insignis Foleyella Rana utricularia, Bufo Abdominal Americana woodhousii Mesenteries Haplonema Amia calva Intestine immutatuin Kalicephalus Elaphe obsoleta, Intestine tennesseensis Coluber constrictor Molineus barbatus Procyon lotor Intestine Oswaldocruzia Bufo woodhousii Intestine leidyi O.
In the aquatic carnivorous plant Utricularia, small organisms such as rotifers, cladocerans, copepods, annelids, rhizopodans, and phytoplankton (Bacillariophyta, Chlorophyta, Cyanophyta, and Euglenophyta), as well as insects, have been recorded as captured (Gordon and Pacheco, 2007).
Marmottant, a researcher in the Interdisciplinary Physics Laboratory at Grenoble University, and his colleagues used high-speed video cameras and powerful microscopes to capture the trapping action of three species of bladderworts in the genus Utricularia.