Uzziah


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Uzziah

(ŭzī`ə), in the Bible, king of Judah, son and successor of Amaziah. He rebuilt Elath, port on the Gulf of Aqaba. He was stricken with leprosy after usurping the duties of high priest. He was succeeded by Jotham. He is referred to as Ozias in the Gospel of St. Matthew.

Uzziah

king of Judah assumed priests’ function of burning incense; punished with leprosy. [O.T.: II Chronicles 26:16–19]
References in periodicals archive ?
Like King Uzziah, who contracts leprosy for his pride, or Jehoram, whose bowels fall out.
The names of Uzziah and Hezekiah are also well-known from the prophecies of Isaiah.
Isaiah testified, "In the year that King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord sitting on a throne, high and lofty; and the hem of his robe filled the temple.
We know that Isaiah received his call after that: "In the year that king Uzziah died, I saw the Lord seated upon the throne .
The lives of Pharaoh, Rehoboam, Uzziah, Haman, Nebuchadnezzar, Belteshazzar, and Herod Agrippa all suffered the results of their arrogance.
A skin disease (leprosy being just a general term) is the fate of King Uzziah for trifling with the incense rites in defiance of the priests and he suffers the proclaimed fate of all those who dabble in "unauthorized coals" and is buried far off, "being cut off from the people.
Uzziah (767-739 BCE) was a visionary eco-monarch who established irrigation systems that made the Negev fruitful.
The chapter begins with a notice that this is the vision of Isaiah, son of Amotz, and lists the Judean kings under whom Isaiah prophesied, starting with Uzziah (at whose death in 742 BCE Isaiah began to prophesy according to Isaiah 6:1), and ending with Hezekiah.
He pointed to the example of Judith on whom God afforded the glory of cutting off Holofernes's head as a reward for the harsh rebuke she gave to the weak and fearful priest Uzziah (Judith 8:12-13:20).
Isaiah was raised under the Godly influence of Judah's king, Uzziah.
A scriptural precedent for the connection between blasphemy and leprosy is present in the figure of King Uzziah of Judah,(103) and Miriam was smitten with leprosy for opposing the authority of Moses (Numbers xii.
According to the version in the Book of Chronicles (but not in the Book of Kings), just when Uzziah attempted to usurp a priestly function in the sanctuary, an eruption appeared on his forehead, which the angry and offended priests labelled leprosy, a virtual banishment-expulsion order, and Uzziah remained a leper-king, ruling through his son.