V-Chip

(redirected from V-chips)
Also found in: Dictionary.

V-chip

[′vē ‚chip]
(communications)
An electronic device that can be programmed to prevent viewing of television programs.

V-Chip

An electronic circuit in a TV that parents can use to block TV programs they consider objectionable for their children. The FCC mandated that post January 1, 2000, all TVs 13" and larger contain the V-Chip. TV programs are rated, based on violence and sexual content, and this rating is transmitted in the TV's vertical blanking interval (VBI). The V-Chip is a programmable closed-caption controller chip that decodes the signals. For existing TVs, a V-Chip set-top box can be added.
References in periodicals archive ?
The v-chip is finally being introduced to Canadian broadcasters and cable companies.
Focus instead on innocuous little things that the federal government couldn't even accomplish--like putting V-chips in television sets and requiring school uniforms--but that would warm the hearts of middle-class swing voters.
He wrote the law that required V-chips in television sets.
Candidates obliged, paternalistically addressing local, private issues such as school uniforms and V-chips.
Even if we take a modest view of these costs, are they truly lower than the cost of V-chips and other means of private regulation?
Bill Clinton spoke out in favor of school uniforms and teen curfews, talked about the importance of installing v-chips in televisions, expressed opposition to cigarette advertising aimed at teenagers, took credit for and urged expansion of the Family and Medical Leave Act, and advocated longer hospital stays for childbirth.
Some historians say that his contribution will lie in his efforts to ease or enrich the lives of ordinary people: 48-hour hospital stays for new mothers, AmeriCorps, tutoring for third graders, extra policemen on the beat, midnight basketball, restrictin g tobacco sales, V-chips to monitor kiddie television.
So in 1996, Clinton wooed them with V-chips, school uniforms, curfews, Internet filters, and restrictions on teen smoking.
V-chips, to be introduced in the US next year, let parents prevent kids from watching.
While the law stipulates that the V-chips must be in televisions by February 1998, more than 200 million existing TVs will not be able to benefit from the V chip signals.
One thing Mrs Bottomley wants to investigate is whether V-chips should be installed in TV sets so children cannot see certain shows.
But not so old-fashioned that he loses his appeal to voters of both genders who are strongly pro-choice on abortion, and to the young who aren't big fans of V-chips or school uniforms.