VCR

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VCR:

see videocassette recordervideocassette recorder
(VCR), device that can record television programs or the images from a video camera on magnetic tape (see tape recorder); it can also play prerecorded tapes.
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VCR

(electronics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

VCR

Video Cassette Recorder
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

VCR

(VideoCassette Recorder) A videotape recording and playback machine that houses both supply and take-up reels of tape in a convenient removable package. The most ubiquitous VCR format was the half-inch VHS videocassette. One inch tape cassettes were used in studios for professional mastering, and Sony's 3/4" U-matic tape cassettes were used in corporate training before VHS tapes became popular. See Betamax, VHS, VTR and VHS ripping.


The VHS Videocassette
Before the DVD, the half-inch VHS videocassette was the most widely used distribution and recording medium for movies.







The First Consumer VCR
The VCR on the left was integrated into the console of an Emerson color TV in 1972. For more details, see Cartrivision. (Image courtesy of LabGuy's World, www.labguysworld.com)
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References in periodicals archive ?
The inside refrigeration space of the refrigeration chamber is cooled, using a direct expansion method, by the evaporator of the VCRS. The refrigeration chamber is characterized by: a functional volume of 1 [m.sup.3], with a single access door and with sandwich polyurethane-plastic walls.
Dixons claimed they were selling 40 DVD players for every VCR but Asda said the industry-wide figures were more like 12 to one.
The world's first VCR was launched in Britain in 1972 but the idea failed to take off because of the clumsy design and crude technology.
* Audio/video cable is necessary to connect the chain of VCRs, as well as the computer to the VCRs and video camera to the computer Cables can be obtained almost anywhere, for as little as $2 each,
In response, BLS proposed to implement a more aggressive product initiation program, which would identify and include in the CPI new goods promptly after they enter the marketplace.(7) Estimating the magnitude of the new product bias on the CPI due to the late inclusion of VCRs exceeds the scope of this article.(8) However, acknowledging this "new product" bias, especially in the context of the "product cycle" helps to distinguish this type of bias from the "quality change" bias that is the subject of this article.
The digital PVRs that are expected to replace VCRs can search channels, provide instant replays of live TV and are claimed to be easier to use than VCRs.
With regards to the frequency of VCR usage, almost 66% of our sample said they used their VCRs up to two hours per week as opposed to 23% that used VCRs between two and four hours per week.
As you consider what to buy, it will help to know about market trends and what's available--whether it's the latest in VCRs or hi-fi speakers.
Americans spend more than $390 million annually on electricity leaking from VCRs. The average VCR requires 5 watts of constant 24-hour-a-day standby power maintain remote control features, channel memory and LED clock displays.
Many newer computers, cable TV boxes, video cassette recorders (VCRs), ceiling fans, cordless drills, and video games likewise stay on while ostensibly switched off.
Despite offering important advances in recording capacity, the first time-lapse VCRs were little more than modified versions of existing home models.