VFR weather

VFR weather

[‚vē‚ef′är ′weth·ər]
(meteorology)
In aviation terminology, route or terminal weather conditions which allow operation of aircraft under visual flight rules.
References in periodicals archive ?
You can be VMC but in VFR weather by simply being 1500 feet away from a cloud.
The third thing we need to understand is how MVAs and VFR weather minima can combine to trip us up if anyone is paying close attention.
The flight must occur in VFR weather during the daytime and would be limited to carrying one passenger.
Special VFR weather minimums for fixed wing aircraft are reduced to a mere one mile of flight visibility and the straightforward requirement to remain clear of clouds when operating within Class B, C, or D surface areas.
Unless the weather is down the tubes and you've been told to expect a hold, or if you're already in a hold, it's not that complicated: You're probably going to find some decent VFR weather allowing a diversion and relatively simple arrival.
Personal minimums, of course, generally are a set of conditions--not unlike the basic VFR weather minimums or the ceiling and visibility requirements for an instrument approach, but also involving other operational considerations--beyond which a pilot vows not to fly.
Class G VFR weather minimums are (mostly) one mile visibility and clear of clouds, so you could easily reach the bottom of Class E at 700 feet on one-mile final with the threshold in sight, and--surprise--there's an aircraft legally in the pattern on base ready to t-bone you.
As a relatively new pilot, I fly for fun, in VFR weather and remain in awe of those who would stray into the path of ice--known or even just possible.
Also of course, basic VFR weather minimums regarding visibility and cloud clearance criteria change depending upon what airspace you're in, at what altitude, the time of day, what category of aircraft you're flying and in what environment (such as in close proximity to a runway).
The pilot must have VFR weather minimums (as appropriate to that airspace) throughout the segment.