VHSIC


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VHSIC

(Very High Speed Integrated Circuit) Pronounced "viz-ick." An earlier name for ultra-high-speed chips. The term came from the name of the program launched by the U.S. Department of Defense in 1980 to advance digital IC technology.
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The irony is that when the VHSIC capabilities were transitioned to both the defense industrial base and the commercial electronics industry, the development processes were the same.
But this rationale put pressure on the program to invest in projects that emphasized military-specific attributes of emerging technologies that commercial manufacturers would not otherwise have developed - the same trap that VHSIC and SCP fell into.
The chief Pentagon agency - the American MITI - the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).(*) During the 1980s, DARPA funded R&D in sectors including very high speed integrated circuits (VHSIC), fiber optics, advanced lasers, computer software, and composite materials, which promised to have commercial applications as well as military uses.
The suite, as a whole, incorporates a range of advanced technology approaches, including extensive use of GaAs substrate MMIC and VHSIC (very high speed integrated circuitry) elements, electronic jamming antenna steering, digital radio frequency memory (DRFM) technology and artificial intelligence pilot's aid application.
ongoing efforts in very high-speed integrated circuitry (VHSIC) design must come to fruition in order to embed the necessary recognition circuity in the Tomahawk [cruise missle].
Spearheading the drive in this country is the DoD, with its Very High Speed Integrated Circuit (VHSIC) program.
In this paper we consider a standard VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) approach to SDR prototyping, for which we develop a reusable library of Intellectual Property (IP) cores for use in Software-Defined Radio (SDR) application prototyping.
Technologies used are reported to include digital RF memory, interferometric direction-finding, multispectral IR detection, MMIC and VHSIC substrate circuitry, electronic scanning and phased-array transmitters.
Since joining STC in 1975, Braggins has been involved with the growth and characterization of extrinsic silicon infrared defectors, bulk silicon crystals for VHSIC and bulk semi-insulating GaAs.
The Avionics Directorate's Pave Pillar program lay the underpinnings for this work, building a small family of data and signal processing modules by exploiting VHSIC and VLSI technology; building power supplies and I/O modules; integrating the modules in a rack and cooling them; and demonstrating fault tolerance and reconfiguration, the use of a fiber-optic high-speed data bus and the use of an Ada operating system.
This seven-year program, which followed on the heels of the successful very high speed integrated circuits (VHSIC) program, started in 1986 and was expected to do for GaAs circuitry what VHSIC had done for Si circuit technology.
It all started when the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA, which is now called ARPA) had completed its highly successful $1 billion very high speed integrated circuit (VHSIC) program, a silicon-based set of digital computer chips that are used in numerous EW systems, devices and components.