VTOL aircraft


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Related to VTOL aircraft: STOL aircraft

VTOL aircraft:

see vertical takeoff and landing aircraftvertical takeoff and landing aircraft
(VTOL), craft capable of rising and descending vertically from and to the ground, thus requiring no runway. While a balloon or an airship has obvious VTOL capability, both are very inefficient at moving parallel to the earth's surface.
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VTOL aircraft

[′vē‚tȯl ‚er‚kraft]
(aerospace engineering)
A heavier-than-air craft that can take off and land vertically. Abbreviation for vertical takeoff and landing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Usually, the position of the VTOL aircraft is obtained by global positioning systems (GPS) [12].
A VTOL aircraft is likely to be quiet enough to operate in cities without disturbing the neighbors
"The DARPA program is looking for ways to expand the speed, range and lift efficiency of VTOL aircraft. Technology advances that support increased capability in those areas is of great interest to the FVL program.
confined areas that other VTOL aircraft such as helicopters cannot access.
America's Osprey is another fast vtol aircraft, but it has the advantages of a more substantial domestic market and stronger political support.
Matrixacents aims to give rotary and fixed wing VTOL aircraft a high level of system intelligence needed to complete complex missions with minimal human oversight and at low altitudes where obstacles abound.
I am hopping mad to hear that the government is going to spend 2.4 billion [pounds sterling] for 14 American-made VTOL aircraft when recently the British-designed and made Harriers were decommissioned.
Army expressed interest in the Kestrel (forerunner of the Harrier) as a replacement for the Mohawk; but the USAF, which had no interest itself in VTOL aircraft, fought against Army acquisition of fixed-wing aircraft even for reconnaissance work.
STOL and VTOL aircraft transported 51,750 passengers and 7,014,845 lb.
"Most VTOL aircraft are extremely intolerant to failures of their propulsion systems," noted Bruce Calkins, general manager of Moller International.
A THIS was the nickname for an experimental vertical-take-off-and-land (VTOL) plane, the prototype for the world's first VTOL aircraft, the Harrier jump jet, which first flew in 1966.