Vakus

Vakus

 

(also vakka; Estonian). (1) An administrative unit of the Estonians and Livy in the Middle Ages. The number of peasant households making up a vakus varied from ten to 100.

(2) A traditional assembly of peasant heads of households in several regions of the Baltic countries, convening from one to five times annually. During the assembly the peasants paid quitrents and met their obligations for services in kind. The assembly also decided peasant court cases. The period of such an assembly was also called a vakus. In the second half of the 16th century and early 17th century these assemblies gradually disappeared.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Although their number per a vakus could vary quite remarkably in different parts of the country, I think that 30-40 as an average could be acceptable in order to make the following calculations simpler.
The discrepancy comes there from the deficiency of cemeteries of the Late Iron Age (but such can be discovered in the future) rather than from the circumstance that there are two or more outstanding cemeteries within one vakus. True, in several vakuses there can be some other features of burying in addition to a 'proper' cemetery; yet, in such cases one is mostly dealing with the limited re-use of older stone graves.