Valerii

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Valerii

 

an ancient Roman patrician family.

Members of the Valerii family took part in almost all the most important events of Roman history. By tradition Valerius Volusus (eighth century B.C.) was considered the ancestor of the Valerii. The family descended in several branches distinguished by nicknames, including Poplicola, Volusus, Potitus, Maximus, Levinus, Messala, and Flaccus. (Certain branches bore several of these nicknames at the same time.) The historian Valerius Antias, the writer Valerius Maximus, and the poet Valerius Flaccus were members of the Valerii family.

References in classic literature ?
One day, at Ljimby Fair, Professor Valerius heard them and took them to Gothenburg.
When Valerius and his wife went to settle in France, they took Daae and Christine with them.
And then he induced Mamma Valerius to indulge a queer whim of his.
At the aunt's request, seconded by Professor Valerius, Daae consented to give the young viscount some violin lessons.
Professor Valerius was dead, but his widow remained in France with Daddy Daae and his daughter, who continued to play the violin and sing, wrapping in their dream of harmony their kind patroness, who seemed henceforth to live on music alone.
She retained just, but only just, enough of this to enter the CONSERVATOIRE, where she did not distinguish herself at all, attending the classes without enthusiasm and taking a prize only to please old Mamma Valerius, with whom she continued to live.
Strike, strike, Valerius, Or Martius' heart will leap out at his mouth.
This admirable duke, Valerius, With his disdain of fortune and of death, Captived himself, has captivated me, And though my arm hath ta'en his body here, His soul hath subjugated Martius' soul.
Born Kathryn Valerius in Elk Township, she was preceded in death by her father and mother, Edward and Emma, as well as sisters Teresa, Lucille and Edna and brothers Edward and Albert.
The topics include how it all began: civil was and Valerius' Argonautica, civil war on the horizon: Seneca's Thyestes and Phoenissae in Statius' Thebaid 7, Vespasian's rise from civil war in Josephus' Bellum Judaicum, engendering civil war in Flavian epic, and instability and the sublime in Martial's Liber Spectaculorum.