Valerius Maximus


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Valerius Maximus

(vəlēr`ēəs măk`sĭməs), c.20 B.C.–c.A.D. 50, Roman author. Little is known of his life. His Factorum ac dictorum memorabilium libri IX [nine books of memorable deeds and sayings] was written c.A.D. 30 and is a miscellany of anecdotes about a variety of subjects. The work was widely popular, especially as a source for writers and orators.

Valerius Maximus

 

Lived during the first century A.D. Roman writer.

Valerius Maximus is the author of the collection Memorable Deeds and Sayings (in nine books), which he wrote during the reign of Emperor Tiberius. This collection was intended primarily for rhetoricians and contained historical examples that could be used in composing speeches. In the works of Valerius Maximus one encounters factual material derived from sources that are no longer extant.

WORKS

Factorum ac dictorum memorabilium libri IX. Published by C. Kempf. Leipzig, 1888.
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Printed Renaissance Commentaries on Valerius Maximus (1470-1600).
Valerius Maximus, a juvenile trained by Paul Cole, has a dubious claim to fame beyond registering his first win in the second leg of the 6f auction.
VALERIUS Maximus looked a winner waiting to happen when second on debut and he has been found the perfect opportunity to go one better in the EBF Maiden at York tomorrow.
While the latter's juveniles normally know what is required first time out, Cole's youngster sometimes need more time and there was plenty of evidence Valerius Maximus was far from the finished article at Windsor as he hung left passing the two-furlong marker.
While the latter's juveniles normally know what is required first time out, Cole's youngster sometimes need more time, and there was plenty of evidence Valerius Maximus was far from the finished article at Windsor as he hung left passing the twofurlong marker.
50) He also includes a variety of classical excerpts by Plautus, Aulus Gellius, Livy, Pliny, Quintilian, Ovid, Caesar, Catullus, and Valerius Maximus and borrows examples from the handbooks of Servius, Varro, Festus, and Nonius Marcellus, even though they did not form part of the elementary curriculum and were likely to be read by students only at a later stage of their schooling.
Pade suggests that the translators often imitate the Latin of Plutarch's sources: the style of Leonardo Bruni's Cato minor, for example, owes much to Valerius Maximus.
Our source, again Valerius Maximus, praises her at 3.
The introduction contains useful contextual information on Gabrielle's life and ancestry, her intellectual background and links to contemporary writers and theologians, but is not entirely free from errors of detail, especially in the identification and attribution of works in Gabrielle's library (the Vergier d'honneur is, for instance, wrongly attributed to Octovien de Saint-Gelais, and Valerius Maximus is credited with Les Faits des Romains instead of the Facta et dicta memorabilia).
Having made his mark with Valerius Maximus and the Rhetoric of the New Nobility, the author now attempts a complex and subtle investigation of the relationship of language and society in Rome, or more properly, of the language of society and the society of language.
Ingres is said to have wept when he read in Valerius Maximus that the sight of Stratonice restored the sick Antiochus to health:
512-13) or Petrus Cantor a passage of Valerius Maximus from the Valerio-Gellian florilegium (Holford-Strevens, [CQ.