Varro


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Varro

Marcus Terentius . 116--27 bc, Roman scholar and satirist
References in periodicals archive ?
In this first modern edition the Satyrica is known as the Saturae or Satires of Petronius, and published in a single volume with the prosimetric satires of Varro and Seneca, along with Priapic poetry.
The osmolality of the media was measured with a Wescor Varro 5520 microosmometer.
"The intricate symbolism and detailed representation of the stories of the Aboriginal culture result not only in vibrant works of art but in poignant reminders of the history of this ancient culture," said Rosalie Varro, who, along with partner Darren Batty, recently opened Kakadu Dreamtime Gallery in Laguna Beach, Calif.
"Herbs are medicines that don't belong in soft drinks, breakfast cereals, and snack chips," herb expert Varro Tyler said at a CSPI press conference in July.
Varro Tyler, a professor emeritus at Purdue University and an internationally known herbal expert, said, "Herbs are drugs.
The study's principal investigator, Ann Cary, also claimed that "nurses who are certified tend to stay longer in the profession and in their healthcare institutions than others" (Varro, 2000).
In fact, the material's properties have been known since antiquity, and is mentioned in Theophrastus, Cato, Varro, Pliny the Elder, Columella, and Plutarch, classical authors who lived and wrote between the 4th century B.C.
Varro Tyler, distinguished professor emeritus of pharmacognosy at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind.
Among those addressing the conference was Varro Tyler, considered one of the world's leading experts on the subject.
Manley today is more often celebrated as a woman writer, an outsider, and even a rebel; ultimately, the mention of Varro reminds the reader of Manley's now less fashionable interests in Tory politics and classical learning.
Tyler's Honest Herbal: A Sensible Guide to the Use of Herbs and Related Remedies, by Varro E.
Varro Tyler, author of The Honest Herbal and a distinguished professor emeritus of pharmacognosy (the study of medicinal plants) at Purdue University, is first to speak up when there is more hype than substance to medicinal claims for herbs.