Vaughan Williams


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Vaughan Williams

Ralph. 1872--1958, English composer, inspired by British folk songs and music of the Tudor period. He wrote operas, symphonies, hymns, and choral music
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Towards the end of English Pastoral Music Saylor writes about Britten, who did admire Holst but rejected Vaughan Williams and (until the end of his life) Elgar, and the styles associated with both of them.
The final day of the festival sees the move to Highnam, when students from Parry's Royal College of Music perform his Piano Quartet, as well as that by his student Herbert Howells and miniatures by Vaughan Williams.
It might be more accurate to call this CD-ROM 'Vaughan Williams in King's Lynn' (its current subtitle), because he also visited central eastern Norfolk in April 1908 and collected some important songs in Acle, Rollesby, and South Walsham.
Despite an increasing presence in both performance and scholarly domains, it seems unlikely that Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958) will be honored with a uniform and complete critical edition any time soon.
But Collon didn't look as comfortable as he did conducting the Vaughan Williams and overall it was rather pedestrian.
And the two sets of jacket notes, written by David Pike and Hugh Cobbe of the Vaughan Williams Charitable Trust, are comprehensive and enlightening.
This strikes one as particularly remarkable given the unusually vivid and immediate character of Vaughan Williams' service, first as an enlisted stretcher bearer in France, where he survived the Somme; in Salonika, where his medical unit was deployed to support a malarial mini-Gallipoli; and then back in France near the end, where he served again at the front as an artillery officer.
The evening was anchored by Walton in the first half and Vaughan Williams in the second - the former offering principal cellist Jonathan Aasgaard the chance to show why he could happily forge a solo career if he chose, and the latter linking both the Phil's current Made in Britain and No.9 series with a terrific essaying of Vaughan Williams' Ninth Symphony, penned a year before he died at 86.
Enid Vaughan Williams died at the Allt Wen Hospital at Tremadog after suffering a stroke.
The idea was first given a public airing last year on behalf of the Racing Forum by trainer Ferdy Murphy but the group's submission to the DCMS - published online alongside 12 other responses - has been given statistical back-up by an independent assessment from Professor Leighton Vaughan Williams of Nottingham Trent University.