Vegetius

Vegetius

(Flavius Vegetius Renatus) (vĭjē`shəs), fl. c.385–400, Roman writer. He is the author of Epitoma rei militaris [a summary of military matters], which is an important source of information about the Roman military system.
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According to Wilkinson (2007) it was Vegetius who in the 4th century AD gave the wisest rule of statecraft: Qui desiderat pacem praeparet belum (Let him who desires peace prepare for war).
Sometime between AD384-389), Vegetius wrote his treatise Epitoma rei militaris (Epitome of military science) (Whipp et al., 1998) that included consideration of the nutritional requirements of marching Roman legionnaires.
This body of work can be traced at least as far back as Xenophon, through many other Greek and Roman writers to include Vegetius, author of the enduring De Re Militari.
This was not a simple task according to Vegetius, especially since inexperienced soldiers became victims of anxiety at the beginning of battle.
"If you want peace, prepare for war." THE original Latin of that expression comes from Epitoma Rei Militaris by Vegetius (Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus).
From the Latin author Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus remained the immortal phrase "Si vis pacem, para bellum", translated in English as "If you want peace you should prepare for war." (9) In other words a well-equipped and strong nation is less likely to be attacked by adversaries--this is the essence of the deterrence models developed during the Cold War.
As the great Roman strategist Vegetius once wrote, "Si vis pacem para bellum" (If you desire peace, prepare for war).
Vegetius's discourse on Roman military tactics was of great interest in the Renaissance, not least for its insights into recruitment, discipline and morale
The word 'Vegetian' comes from the late Roman theorist on military strategy, Vegetius. Stephen Morillo defines an important part of Vegetian-style warfare as 'shadowing the invading army closely enough [so] as to prevent their foraging.