Grand Prince

(redirected from Velikii kniaz)
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Grand Prince

 

(velikii kniaz’, after 1533 usually translated as grand duke), in Kievan Rus’ and during the period of feudal fragmentation, the title held by the chief of all princes (from the tenth century, the grand prince of Kiev; from the 13th century, the grand prince of Vladimir) and from the 12th to 14th centuries, also by the rulers of the major principalities, which included within them vassal appanage principalities (the grand princes of Moscow, Tver’, Yaroslavl, Riazan’, Smolensk, Nizhny Novgorod, and others). After the creation of the centralized Russian state (late 15th and early 16th centuries), the title of grand duke was held only by the grand duke of Moscow; in 1547, it became part of the tsar’s title and in 1721, part of the emperor’s. In the Russian Empire members of the imperial family were called grand dukes. During the 14th to 16th centuries the feudal rulers of Lithuania also bore the title of grand duke. In 1569 the title of Grand Duke of Lithuania became part of the Polish royal title.

V. B. KOBRIN

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet he also seems to accept that princeps can be translated as kniaz' or gosudar', or used in the form Magnus Dux (velikii kniaz') to distinguish the Muscovite ruler from the German Imperator (Kaiser) or the Latin rex (king) which was used in Poland.
To proceed to kniaz' and velikii kniaz': it is usually translated as "prince," or "grand prince" in the case of the actual ruler of pre-imperial Russia, states Filiushkin.
Danilov, Velikii Kniaz' Nikolai Nikolaevich, Paris: Imprimerie de Navaree, 1930, 281.
Ganelin, "Velikii kniaz" Mikhail Meksandrovich i Nikolai II," Dora Romanovykh v istorii Rossii (St.
Sukhomlinov, Velikii Kniaz' Nikolai Nikolaevich (mladshii), Berlin: Izdanie Avtora, 1925.
Poppe then provides two studies of the title "grand prince" (velikii kniaz') in Kievan Rus'.