Venetian

(redirected from Venetians)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Venetian

1. of, relating to, or characteristic of Venice or its inhabitants
2. a native or inhabitant of Venice
3. a cotton or woollen cloth used for linings

Venetian, Venetian mosaic

A type of terrazzo topping containing large chips.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ortega primarily examines Ottoman--Venetian encounters during a time of transition between the War of Cyprus (1574) and the War of Candia (1645) when the Ottomans and Venetians were experiencing peaceful relations and Venetian commercial interests shifted focus away from the sea.
Many Venetians believe that they contribute more to the well-being of Italy than they receive in the form of public-service investment.
"Surveys show that it is wanted by the overwhelming majority of Venetians. To speed up the process we need the support and help of as many Venetians as possible."
- Anne Cain, by email Elsa, you can buy orange venetian blinds from Hillary's metal venetians collection.
ZENA SAYS: Firstly, Elsa, you can buy orange venetian blinds from Hillary's metal venetians collection.
In a second group of articles examining the role an idealized vision of Venice played in shaping actions and policies, Finlay argues that Venetians' belief in the immortality of their republic and in the excellence of their institutions blinded the ruling elite to the exigencies of their rapidly changing circumstances.
Gilded and enameled glass was a domain in which Venetians gradually began to compete seriously with the Near East and, by the late 15th century, Venetian glassmakers were supplying lamps to mosques in Mamluk, Egypt.
The wily Venetians had no intention of jeopardizing such a commercial windfall as exclusive access to Egyptian ports, and began laying plans of their own to divert the entire enterprise to a different end.
We are assured, for example, in 'Venetian Epilogue', that the myth 'lived by the heirs' of certain Venetians 'enjoyed an order refractory to autotelic mental experiments'.
Back in 1291 the Venetians used their secret police to promote the economy.
But renegade Venetian writers were beginning to openly challenge church authority, which provoked a papal interdict in 1606 withholding the most fundamental sacraments from Venetians for almost a year.
Would there be competing Chinese biennials without the superheated market for exportable Chinese art?) The inspired Venetians who founded the Biennale saw a way to mimic the money machine of a world's fair, but to do it on a smaller scale, repeatable every two years with the portable, perpetually renewable objects of contemporary art.