Venezia Giulia


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Venezia Giulia

(vānā`tsyä jo͞o`lyä), former region, 3,356 sq mi (8,692 sq km), NE Italy, on the Adriatic Sea. It was formed after World War I from part of the territories ceded by Austria to Italy in 1919, and included E Friuli, Trieste, Istria, and part of Carniola. Fiume was added in 1921. Except along the coast, the population is Slovenian, and after World War II most (c.2,890 sq mi/7,485 sq km) of Venezia Giulia was ceded by Italy to Yugoslavia. Most of Istria was joined with Croatia; part of Friuli and Carniola was combined with Slovenia and another portion (c.285 sq mi/740 sq km) formed the Free Territory of Trieste (divided in 1954 between Italy and Yugoslavia). The rest of Venezia Giulia (c.180 sq mi/470 sq km), part of Gorizia prov., remained Italian and was merged with Udine prov. to form the new region of Friuli–Venezia GiuliaFriuli–Venezia Giulia
, region (1991 pop. 1,197,666), 3,031 sq mi (7,850 sq km), NE Italy, bordering on Austria in the north and on Slovenia in the east. Trieste is the capital of the region, which is divided into Gorizia, Pordenone, Trieste, and Udine provs.
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Venezia Giulia

a former region of NE Italy at the N end of the Adriatic: divided between Yugoslavia and Italy after World War II; now divided between Italy and Slovenia
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The partner regions consist of Friuli Venezia Giulia - the leading partner region of the project - Lombardy, Piedmont, Lazio, Veneto, Liguria, Emilia-Romagna, Puglia, Sicily, Sardinia, Marche and Umbria - who together boast 119 of Italy's golf courses - with six further regions falling under the investment of the Italian Golf Federation.
Bu Khadhoor also met with the deputy mayor of Trieste and discussed cooperation between Kuwait and the autonomous Friuli Venezia Giulia region.
After World War II, The Italian provinces of Istria, Dalmatia, and Venezia Giulia were relegated to the Communist rule of Marshal Tito of Yugoslavia, who killed and forced the evacuation of thousands of Italians.
Much of the Italian debate over the actions of the socialist Yugoslav regime in Istria, specifically, and Venezia Giulia, more broadly, from 1945 on has hinged on whether violence towards Italians resident in those territories may be understood as a result of the preceding history of fascist brutality towards Slavic populations.