Ventilation effectiveness

Ventilation effectiveness

The system’s ability to remove pollutants generated by internal sources in a space, zone, or building. In comparison, air change effectiveness describes the ability of an air distribution system to ventilate a space, zone, or building.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increased ventilation rate does not always result in better ventilation effectiveness when using warm air heating.
W Assessing the ventilation effectiveness of naturally ventilated livestock buildings under wind dominant conditions using computational fluid dynamics.
Experimental study of air distribution and ventilation effectiveness in a room with a combination of different mechanical ventilation and heating/ cooling systems.
Building on previous research dealing with ventilation air distribution, this study added new elements of ventilation effectiveness research, accounting for source of outside air, particle contaminants, formaldehyde, and volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants.
Ventilation effectiveness is maximized, particularly for perimeter rooms in cooling-dominated climates, by Type A ceiling-mounted, horizontal-throw diffusers, with maximum throw reaching the far wall and with exhaust registers.
It was found that the use of a secondary PV system in conjunction with a primary air-conditioning system in a hot and humid climate can efficiently enhance thermal comfort and improve the ventilation effectiveness at the immediate breathing zone by up to 50% more than can be obtained with mixing ventilation (MV) alone (Sekhar et al.
26 states that Ventilation effectiveness is a measure of how well a ventilation system works in terms of delivering the supply air to the occupants of a building.
Recognizing their sustainable design benefits, the USGBC LEED Rating System awards points for operable windows in the Ventilation Effectiveness and Controllability of Systems credit categories," Brenden explains.
Ventilation efficiency is the term used to quantify ventilation effectiveness, being a measure of the ability of a ventilation system to exhaust the pollutants generated within a space.
Using displacement ventilation increases the ventilation effectiveness and, thus, improves the IAQ for a specific air change rate compared with mixing ventilation.
Specifications to receive LEED certification address over fifty requirements such as diverse issues as storm water management, the utilization of renewable energy, building reuse, construction waste management, low-emitting materials, and ventilation effectiveness.
The code is based on three assumptions: enough outside air is provided to dilute internally generated contaminated air, the outdoor air being used for ventilation is clean, and the supply of air to the room obtains 100 % mixing or ventilation effectiveness.