Verdun-Sur-Meuse

Verdun-Sur-Meuse

 

city in northeastern France, in the Meuse Department, on the Meuse (Maas) River. Population, 25,000 (1968). The city is a railroad junction and has food industries. In antiquity it was a Gallic settlement under the name of Verodunum and became an important city under the Romans. From the fourth century Verdun has been an episcopal see. The Treaty of Verdun of 843 was concluded here; according to this treaty Verdun became part of Lothair’s state. The city became part of the East Frankish Kingdom (Germany) and in the 13th century was made an imperial city. In 1552 France took possession of Verdun, which finally became French in 1648. Beginning in the 17th century Verdun has been a military fortress covering the road to Paris from the east. In World War I, Verdun was besieged in 1916. In World War II the city was occupied by the fascist German Army from 1940 to 1944; it was liberated by the American Third Army, which acted in cooperation with the French Army and with partisan detachments.

REFERENCE

Clouet, L’abbé. Histoire de Verdun et du pays Verdunois, vols. 1-3. Verdun, 1867-70.
References in periodicals archive ?
Let her spend thirty seconds inside the mistake of him, hear the glass bottle shattering, the noise knowledge made as it ripped into him somewhere north of Verdun-sur-Meuse in the frosty gray dawn, damp air, back cold against the trench wall, the order to charge, the panicky scrabble from one system of belief into another.
The Battle of Verdun was one of the longest and most critical single engagements of World War One, fought in 1916 around the city of Verdun-sur-Meuse. It cost hundreds of thousands of lives.
The Battle of Verdun was one of the longest and most critical single engagements of World War I, fought between German and French soldiers in 1916 around the city of Verdun-sur-Meuse in north-east France.