Very Large Array


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Very Large Array

See VLA.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Very Large Array

[¦ver·ē ¦lärj ə′rā]
(astronomy)
An array near Socorro, New Mexico, of 27 separate radio telescopes on movable platforms, arranged along the arms of a Y, designed to provide radio pictures which have an angular resolution comparable with that of the best optical telescopes. Abbreviated VLA.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Answers will vary but may include: The radio dish is similar to the Very Large Array because it is dish-shaped and collects radio waves.
Last year, using the Very Large Array radio telescope near Socorro, they took an image of a bright nebula surrounding the pulsar and compared it with an image taken in 1993.
In a test of that capability, he and his colleagues used the Very Large Array of radio dishes at Socorro, N.M., to look again at the environs of the Coma cluster.
The image is based on a new computer analysis of observations taken a decade ago with the Very Large Array (VLA), a network of 27 radio telescopes near Socorro, N.M.
Known as FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-centimeters), the survey uses the Very Large Array, a bank of telescopes near Socorro, N.M.
Studies with the Very Large Array radio telescope near Socorro, N.M., confirm that what had seemed a single star in the L1551 molecular cloud--a star-birth region 450 light-years from Earth--is in fact two stars.
In their ongoing study, Wilkinson and his colleagues rely on several instruments, including the Very Large Array near Socorro, N.M., and the MERLIN network of radio telescopes spread across England, to examine thousands of distant galaxies.
However, the new data consist of high-resolution images from the Very Large Array radio telescope in Socorro and the W.M.
Using the Very Large Array Radio Telescope at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory near Socorro, N.M., Dale A.
Combining data from the Very Large Array radio telescope near Socorro, N.M., and NASA's 70-meter single-dish antenna in Goldstone, Calif., the astronomers found that at some spots, the infalling gas moves toward Earth, while at others it recedes at the same speed.

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