Very Large Telescope


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Very Large Telescope

(VLT) An optical telescope of the European Southern Observatory sited on Cerro Paranal in Chile, altitude 2600 meters. It consists of four 8.2-meter telescopes, each with a thin meniscus primary mirror mounted separately on a N–S baseline on an altazimuth mounting. The manufacture of the mirrors was completed between 1999 and 2001. The reflectors are usable in combination (equivalent to a 16-meter single telescope), individually, or as an interferometer.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: The planet Beta Pictoris b (arrowed) is visible orbiting its host star in this composite image from the European Southern Observatory's 3.6m telescope and the NACO instrument on the ESO's 8.2-m Very Large Telescope.
POWERFUL Part of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at ESO's Cerro Paranal observing site
The discovery was made using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope, with other images also coming from the Hubble Space Telescope and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope.
LBT is an optical telescope that relies on mirrors, and the technology for very large telescope mirrors is relatively young.
Set on top of a 2600m high peak, the Cerro Paranal observatory has an unequalled view of the heavens through the world's most powerful and sophisticated astronomical device, the prosaically named Very Large Telescope (VLT).
Membership will give UK astronomers access to the four 8.2 metre and several 1.8 metre telescopes which comprise the Very Large Telescope at Atacama in Chile.
The Very Large Telescope is a joint effort between eight European nations.
The device, known as the VLT - Very Large Telescope - can spot an astronaut walking on the surface of the moon.
The European Southern Observatory's Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument at the Very Large Telescope measures a few meters across.
Astronomers have now used the power of ESO's Very Large Telescope to explore one of its lesser known regions.
Nine years after ESO's Very Large Telescope captured the first image of an exoplanet, the planetary companion to the brown dwarf 2M1207 (eso0428), the same team has caught on camera what is probably the lightest of these objects so far.

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