viaduct

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viaduct

(vī`ədŭkt') [Lat.,=road conveyor], type of bridge for carrying a highway or railroad over a valley, over low ground, or over a road. It is commonly constructed in the form of several towers or piers that support arches on which the roadway rests. Viaducts are usually constructed of steel or concrete; in the past they were built of wood or stone. Examples of viaducts include the Pulaski Skyway in NE New Jersey and the Colorado Street Bridge in Pasadena, Calif. The world's longest viaduct, the Danyang-Kunshan Grand Bridge (102.4 mi/164.8 km), is part of the Nanjing to Shanghai section of the Beijing–Shanghai High-Speed Railway in China.

Viaduct

An elevated structure supported on a series of arches, piers, or trestles that carries a roadway or railway over a valley or other depression.

Viaduct

 

a bridgelike structure, usually of great length and built on high supporting piers; used when a road crosses ravines, gorges, swampy river valleys, and so on.

Viaducts are sometimes built instead of high embankments if the construction of the latter is economically unfeasible or technically inadvisable—for example, as a result of weakness in the foundation soil. A gradual increase in the height of the piers (and, in certain types of viaducts, also in the size of the spans at the highest point) distinguishes the viaduct from the trestle bridge, which usually has a negligible change in the height of its piers and spans of identical size. Viaducts are built of stone, metal, concrete, or reinforced concrete; for the most part they are of multispan arch design, less frequently of beam construction.

Viaducts were well known even in ancient Rome, where they were built in a system of arches made up of large stone blocks; this gave the viaducts an appearance of austere power, characteristic of the utilitarian Roman structures. Since the end of the 19th century, stone viaducts have been replaced by those built of metal and reinforced concrete. The construction possibilities of these materials and the development of a scientific theory of bridge building have made possible a considerable decrease in the volume and weight of the structure’s main components and have had an effect on the construction of modern viaducts, in which the architectural image is based on the emotional expressiveness of plastically conceived exposed structures that are subordinate to engineering principles (for example, a reinforced-concrete viaduct in Nogent-sur-Marne, France; and the Polcévera Viaduct in Genoa, 1961, engineer R. Morandi).

REFERENCE

Nadezhdin, B. M. Mosty i puteprovody v gorodakh. Moscow, 1964.

viaduct

[′vī·ə‚dəkt]
(civil engineering)
A bridge structure supported on high towers with short masonry or reinforced concrete arched spans.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company in Scotland is working to strengthen the Garden Street Viaduct in Glasgow and the Oak Bank viaduct on the Edinburgh to Glasgow mainline.
The Ouseburn viaduct carries the East Coast main line but with the passing of the years and changes in railway traffic and speed, a 20mph limit was imposed.
The Taraf daily reported on Wednesday that inspectors from the Ministry of Labor had failed to conduct the required safety audits at viaduct column number 35, where the three workers died.
The viaduct used to carry the railway line that ran all the way from Teesside along the coast to Whitby and was one of several such bridges along the route.
Pavlova noted that the traffic at the viaducts would be stopped in stages to cause minimal disruptions.
Opus has been carrying out the work for Network Rail on Victorian viaducts across the country.
The third question is answered by the cities that have taken down their viaducts.
The Bidston Moss Viaduct has long been earmarked for major refurbishment and strengthening, which is now due to start in summer next year.
This phase involving both Bedworth and Longford Viaducts will take approximately nine weeks to complete.
Police were called to the scene, which is popular with dog walkers, and discovered the body in a field below the viaduct.
Millau is in the tradition of the great European viaducts by Robert Maillart and Christian Menn, but on an even larger scale.