Viazemskii

Viazemskii

 

a city (prior to 1951, a settlement), the center of Viazemskii Raion, Khabarovsk Krai, RSFSR. It has a railroad station 130 km south of Khabarovsk. Population, 18,000 (1970). The city has railroad transport enterprises, a woodworking combine, a timber procurement enterprise, a vegetable cannery, a dairy, a mechanical-repair plant, and a brickworks. There is also a forestry technicum. [5_1797_1]

References in periodicals archive ?
Here I would single out two articles devoted to a detailed commentary on the archives of individual noblemen: Vasilii Viazemskii (by Mikhail Velizhev) and Ivan Bariatinskii (by Andreas Schonle).
"Ethiopian" here comes as a reference to Viazemskii's pun in his letter to Alexander Turgenev, calling Pushkin "bes arabskii" ("Arabian devil"), a pun on "the "bessarabskii" ("Bessarabian").
But it would appear that dozens of Russian writers were similarly struck by the beauty of Venice, among them Muratov, Lermontov, Viazemskii, Apukhtin, Bunin, Gumilev, Khodasevich, Turgenev, Pasternak, Akhmatova, Mandel'shtam, Brodskii, and Kushner.
Chester Rzadkiewicz examines Polevoi's Moscow Telegraph (1825-34) and in particular its role in the debate of 1829-31 about the alleged existence and attitudes of a 'literary aristocracy' (including Pushkin, Viazemskii and their supporters).
Viazemskii, for example, strove to "present literature as an independent area with its own history, its own symbolic figures" (208), which conception demanded that his biographies themselves employ new narrative forms.
Kol'tsov here is seen as the fulfillment of a Romantic, idealistic vision of a fully natural poet, "a child of nature, meek, simple-hearted," as he was called by one member of Stankevich's circle, Prince Viazemskii, in a letter to Aleksandr Turgenev (Kol'tsov, xxvi).
Her Viazemskii is enjoyably robust, one of Lermontov's wordier late poems (p.
She draws attention throughout to Prince Petr Viazemskii (a Russian official serving in Poland) and to the brothers Aleksandr and Nikolai Turgenev.
Viazemskii, "O 'Bakhchisaraiskom fontane' ne v literaturnom otnoshenii" and accompanying primechaniia (notes), in Pushkin v prizhiznennoi kritike, 1820-1827, ed.
Viazemskii, "seemed ordinary and similar to the previous wars that were forced on us by Napoleon's ambition." Public opinion had been "neither greatly shaken nor particularly frightened" by the war, and the discussions and debates of the unfolding events underway in society and at the English Club were "as ordinary as the circumstances in which they were taking place." (69) After Alexander I's visit to the old capital, the war became a national event.
The epigraph to the first chapter is found in Pushkin's letter to Viazemskii (1 September 1828).
Viazemskii, disapproved of the Decembrists' recourse to violence.