Vibrionaceae


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Vibrionaceae

[‚vib·rē·ō′nās·ē‚ē]
(microbiology)
A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rods; cells are straight or curved and usually motile by polar flagella; generally found in water.
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Vibrionaceae was the third most abundant family and was detected at high levels the in pH 7.38 treatment at 48 h (7.67%) (Fig.
Vibrio cholerae of the Vibrionaceae family is the causative agent for cholera.
Analysis effluent indicated that it was rich in Enterobacteriaceae (Escherichia coli), Pseudomonaceae (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), Vibrionaceae (Vibrio cholera) and Bacillaceae (Bacillus sp).
(2) One of the emerging organisms is bacteria in the genus Vibrio, which belongs to the Vibrionaceae family.
Vibriosis is an underrecognized and underreported infection caused by species of the family Vibrionaceae other than toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139, which cause cholera (1,2).
It was not until its reclassification into the family Vibrionaceae and named after James Shewan in honor of his work in marine microbiology (3), 30 species and infections have been identified.
Most of these isolates belong to the family Enterobacteriaceae, which are not indigenous to the marine environment, and some belong to Vibrionaceae (Table 7).
Our hypotheses in this project are twofold: total bacteria and Vibrionaceae concentrations are strongly related to environmental quality and market oyster quality is poorer than the Delaware Inland Bays' oysters.
In fact, all tested genera/species in the family Vibrionaceae possess two chromosomes [4].
The Vibrionaceae family of gram negative rods consist of roughly a dozen or so species divided clinically into generally two categories of infection: cholera due to V.
For unpreserved fish, spoilage is a result of Gramnegative, fermentative bacteria (such as Vibrionaceae), psychrotolerant Gram-negative bacteria (such as Pseudomonas spp.
Species of the highly diverse Vibrionaceae family are commonly associated with marine invertebrates (Cheng et al.