Vibriosis


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vibriosis

[‚vib·rē′ō·səs]
(veterinary medicine)
An infectious bacterial disease, primarily of cattle, sheep, and goats, caused by Vibrio fetus and characterized by abortion, retained placenta, and metritis.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Vibriosis

 

vibrionic abortion, an infectious disease of cattle and sheep and, rarely, of swine and goats. Cases of the disease have been established in humans. Caused by a spiral-shaped polymorphic microbe, Vibrio fetus, of the genus Vibrio, family Spirillaceae. The causative agent of vibriosis was first obtained from sheep after abortion and from their aborted fetuses by the English scientists J. Macfadyen and C. Stockman in 1913 and from the aborted fetuses of cows by T. Smith in 1918.

The causative agent of vibriosis is localized in the sperm of bulls, in the sexual organs of sexually mature and immature females, in the fetal membranes and fetuses of pregnant females, and in other tissues. The disease manifests itself by massive infertility of cows and heifers, abortions at various stages of gestation, delay of afterbirth after abortion or normal calving, vaginitis, and metritis. In sheep massive abortions are observed in the second half of the gestation period. In swine and goats the disease is rarely manifested by abortions. In males the symptoms of the disease are not noticeable. In cattle the infection is transmitted during mating, by artificial insemination with sperm from diseased bulls, or by keeping diseased animals together with healthy ones. Sheep are infected mainly by infested fodder or water in the pasture. Aborted fetuses and discharges from the vaginas of sheep that have had abortions are a source of infection. Control measures include the isolation and treatment of sick animals and the careful disinfection of infected premises. The sheep are removed from infected pens and pastures. In order to prevent abortions and decrease infertility, cows and heifers of herds subject to vibriosis are given intrauterine antibiotics during the breeding season. Pregnant animals are given antibiotics in the fodder for prophylaxis.

REFERENCE

Evseichenko, R. I. Vibrioz krupnogo rogatogo skota. Minsk, 1968. (Bibliography.)

P. A. TRILENKO

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Vibrio species causing vibriosis. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2018.
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