Nike

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Nike

Nike (nīˈkē), in Greek religion and mythology, goddess of victory, daughter of Pallas and Styx. Often an attendant of Zeus or Athena, she also presided over all contests, athletic as well as military. She was a popular subject in art, usually represented as winged and bearing a wreath or palm branch. The Victory (or Nike) of Samothrace (Louvre) is one of the finest extant Greek sculptures. The Romans identified Nike with Victoria.
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Nike

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Nike, asteroid 307 (the 307th asteroid to be discovered, on March 5, 1891), is approximately 58 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 5 years. It is named after the Greek goddess of victory. Nike indicates a fortunate outcome to activities undertaken in matters associated with its sign and house position.

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Astronomical Names. London: Routledge, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.
The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Nike

 

the personification of victory in ancient Greece; often an epithet of the goddess Athena, to whom the Temple of Nike (with many statues of Nike) at the Athenian Acropolis was dedicated.

Statues of Nike descending from heaven as a messenger of the gods were erected in honor of victory in war or in athletic or art competitions. The best known statues of Nike are the works of Paeonius and the statue of Nike from the island of Samothrace. In ancient Rome, Nike was identified with Victoria.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Nike

(Victoria) winged goddess of triumph. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 757]
See: Victory
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
You might well start with Audrey Hepburn as the Winged Victory of Samothrace standing on the steps of The Louvre in the film Funny Face.
Posters of such masterpieces as the Mona Lisa, the Winged Victory of Samothrace, and Starry Night are available through the Museum Shop.
A racing car whose hood is adorned by great pipes, like serpents of explosive breath--a roaring car that seems to run on shrapnel--is more beautiful than the Victory of Samothrace.
was once anything other than mush is as arduous as the proposition that Barbie is related to the Winged Victory of Samothrace. The problem here, though, is that Keillor is lashing out at NPR for imitating its biggest success--him.
In particular, some classical statuary wobbles so much in transit that you can understand how this Victory of Samothrace lost her head.
Some of its surviving products -- the Victory of Samothrace, the Laocoon, the Belvedere Torso, the Venus de Milo, the Dying Gaul, the Farnese Bull, the Barberini Faun--are among the most familiar images in Western art.
Any sportsman will tell you that the only three things to see in the Louvre are the "Winged Victory of Samothrace," the "Venus de Milo" and the "Mona Lisa." The rest of the sculpture and paintings are just so much window dressing for the Big Three, and one hates to waste time in the Louvre when there is so much else to see in Paris.
Slipstream belongs to a long line of works attempting to evoke motion in solid form, going back to the Winged Victory of Samothrace and including such Futurist pieces as Boccioni's running figure, Unique Forms of Continuity in Space (1913).
is more beautiful than the Victory of Samothrace," he shouted at his unsuspecting readers.
Her humor is misplaced as well: the statue of the Victory of Samothrace, for example, will never fly away from the Louvre, where it has been ensconced for so long.
At the School of Fine Arts, at the entrance of which is a reproduction of the Victory of Samothrace next to a huge Warhol-like can of Coca-Cola, they were all busy producing posters for his presidential campaign.