video camera

(redirected from Videocamera)
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Related to Videocamera: Professional video camera

video camera

An electronic device that captures and records motion pictures one frame at a time. Each frame is captured as a series of horizontal lines, the number of which determines the fundamental visual quality of the images. For example, North American analog TV (NTSC) has 525 lines of "standard definition" (SD) resolution, 480 of which are the image. Analog TV was superseded by digital TV, which provides 480 lines of SD resolution along with 720 and 1080 lines of "high-definition" (HD) resolution. See video format, camcorder, SD formats, HD formats, NTSC, DTV and video/TV history.


High Tech for 1939
This RCA video camera from 1939 used the all-electronic Iconoscope picture tube, but did not even have a viewfinder. That came later. Videotape recording would not come until 1956. (Image courtesy of Early Television Foundation, www.earlytelevision.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
Schlossberg contended in his case that he notified Solesbee that he would be recording their interaction and held his videocamera in plain view.
More about accurate timing can be found in Sky & Telescope's November 2000 issue (page 109), including use of the PC-23C videocamera available for $90 from Supercircuits (www.
Unknown to the subjects, their facial and gestural responses to each slide were recorded by a hidden videocamera.
The cost of making a movie or TV show used to be an insurmountable barrier to entry for nonpros, but the dawn of YouTube and the high-def digital videocamera changed all that.
As part of the service, a man with a videocamera (Barry Well) stands by a rack of small set models.
Rather than finding substitute copies or taping them off DVDs from the big competitor down the street, the buddies procure a large videocamera and shoot their own highly abbreviated versions and pass these on to customers, at least one of whom, lonely sparrow Miss Falewicz (Mia Farrow), doesn't know the difference.
Hou's fascination with the arts is very much in evidence here, and even allows for a strain of self-reflexivity: Song, a cinema major, references the Lamorisse film early on and later uses her videocamera to record Simon walking around the city with red balloon in tow.
In a strange sequence, Mercer augments what Deschanel sarcastically dubs his "crime spree" by stealing a fancy videocamera from a porn director who calls himself Sergio Leone.
Even if everyone with a digital videocamera can now make a movie and post it online, mass-market experiences--like going to see "Mission: Impossible III" at a moviehouse--are still likely to aggregate substantial worldwide auds.