Vidyapati


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Vidyapati

 

(also Bidyapati). Birth and death dates unknown. Indian poet of the 15th century. Born in the village of Bisapi, present-day Bihar.

A court poet, Vidyapati is known as the bard of the love of the god Krishna (incarnation of Vishnu) and the shepherdess Radha. The language and style of his poetry, written in the Maithili dialect, influenced the work of the Vishnuite poets of Bengal. He wrote the poem Liana of Glory in a late form of Prakrit—Apabhransha (Abaxamma)—and lyric poems (Trial of a Man and others) in Sanskrit. Some of Vidyapati’s imitators signed his name, which makes the establishment of his original works difficult.

References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for construction of plus 2 level school building g plus 2 at m k p vidyapati high school
Gujju was also involved in an encounter with the Bano police in Simdega district on April 8, 2017, where police station in-charge Vidyapati Singh and a security personnel Toram Biruli lost their lives.
If he were not live in the 20th century, he would have considered as Kabir, Ramprosad or Vidyapati of bygone days.
Listen to this poem by the fourteenth-or fifteenth-century Mithili poet Vidyapati, whose Krishna pleads, in earthy, sexually explicit language for the returned love of his paramour:
Smith, an American scholar resident in Stockholm, Sweden ascribes three reasons to the elevation of Maithili as a literary language in Assam, Bengal, and Nepal: (i) Old Maithili's "sweetness/mellifluousness", (ii) its sacred status on account of its "increasingly closer association with Krsna literature", and (iii) its great stature as a literary language as epitomized in the love songs of Vidyapati. To quote Smith:
In response, the government has taken steps for the renovation of auditoriums like Premchand Rangshala and Vidyapati Bhawan hoping to create a cultural ambience like olden times.
Thus, the sacred and profane, divine and human love are amicably reconciled in the Vaisnava lyrics of Jayadeva, Vidyapati and Candidasa.
In Bengal and Bihar, Jayadeva's poetical celebration of the Radha-Krishna theme was followed between the 14th and 16th centuries by Vidyapati, Chaitanya and Chandidas.
'Girl Playing with a Peacock': He left me saying he would return tomorrow./I covered the floor of my home/Writing repeatedly 'tomorrow'./When dawn returned, they all enquired:/Tell us, friend,/When will your tomorrow come?/tomorrow, tomorrow, I lost all hopes./My beloved never returned./Says Vidyapati: Listen, beautiful one,/Other women lured him away.
Nos encontrabamos en el cafe Las Americas y el me entregaba los tomitos breves y hermosos que publicaba en la coleccion El Pozo y el Pendulo de la Editorial Latitudes: La sangre de Medusa, de Jose Emilio Pacheco y traducciones de Gabriel Zaid (Canciones de Vidyapati), Octavio Paz (15 poemas de Apollinaire) y Francisco Serrano (Canciones egipcias).
Vidyapati says, How will you pass this night without you lord?
They will tattoo all of Baidyanath Babadham,(7) They will tattoo all of Jhariya, all of Dhanbad, and all of Bokaro,(8) They will go where there are piles of precious stones and pearls, They will tattoo Jagjivan Ram,(9) They will tattoo Kunvar Singh,(10) a martyr for his country, They will tattoo Vidyapati, Bhikhari, and Mahendra,(11) They will engrave a sun or moon on their arms.