Viet Cong


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Viet Cong

(vēĕt` kông), officially Viet Nam Cong San [Vietnamese Communists], People's Liberation Armed Forces in South Vietnam. The term was originally applied by Diem's regime to Communist troops (about 10,000) left in hideouts in South Vietnam after the Geneva Conference of 1954, following the French Indochina War (1946–54). Most Communist troops, according to the agreements, had withdrawn to North Vietnam. Supported and later directed by North Vietnam, the Viet Cong first tried subversive tactics to overthrow the South Vietnamese regime, then resorted to open warfare (see Vietnam WarVietnam War,
conflict in Southeast Asia, primarily fought in South Vietnam between government forces aided by the United States and guerrilla forces aided by North Vietnam. The war began soon after the Geneva Conference provisionally divided (1954) Vietnam at 17° N lat.
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). They were subsequently reinforced by huge numbers of North Vietnamese troops infiltrating south, and aided in the reunification of Vietnam following the collapse of South Vietnam in 1975.
References in periodicals archive ?
Before my memory fails me, let me recall my coverage in what was then South Vietnam before Saigon, now Ho Chi Minh City, fell to the communist Viet Congs.
The first featured the bloody and confused aftermath of the penetration of the American embassy compound in Saigon by a few Viet Cong commandos.
"During the monsoon season, the Viet Cong were able to dig the tunnels by hand in the moist clayey soil," Olson said.
During the 1967 Tet Nguyen Dan, the North Vietnamese army and the Viet Cong entered into a cease-fire with the South Vietnamese army and American forces.
By his successful predictions of insurgent attack plans, he was able to thwart all their efforts by directing barrages of small arms, mortar, and artillery fire in conjunction with devastating air strikes against Viet Cong positions and attack zones.
Some had come under sniper fire, shelling an attack by the Viet Cong, ending up dead or wounded.
"This is where the order for the Tet Offensive to begin was given," says Ngoc, a diminutive 64-year-old former Viet Cong fighter, as he shows me a dusty set of chairs in the middle of the meeting room.
1966: At least eight people are killed when Viet Cong artillery shells hit the South Vietnamese capital.
The over 200-km-long Cu Chi Tunnels allowed the Viet Cong to gather within striking distance of then enemy capital Saigon and served as headquarters for the Tet Offensive in 1968, the turning point of the Vietnam War.
Built over two decades (often with mere shovels and bare hands), beginning in the 1940s, the tunnels provided shelter and a base of operations for the Viet Minh, later the Viet Cong, "peasants in black pajamas," as they were contemptuously dismissed by American soldiers, who wore not boots but so-called Ho Chi Minh sandals, flip-flops with tire cut-out soles, and fought against Japanese, then French and finally American invaders, invaders who brought with them a vastly superior military arsenal to the battlefield, but were still defeated.
More than anything else, Komer is best remembered as the architect of President Lyndon Johnson's ill-fated program--"pacification" it was called in the mid 1960s--to woo the hearts and minds of South Vietnamese peasants away from the Communist Viet Cong.
In this remote part of southern Vietnam, rising sea waters, erosion and the impact of upstream dam development on the Mekong River are proving a more serious threat than the Viet Cong guerrillas whom Kerry battled in 1968 and 1969.